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Luke Dollimore Collection, 1994.04.27, Durban: [Set of Three Still Images]

Nelson Mandela casting his vote for the first time at Ohlange High School near Durban. Next to him is Gay McDougall, an America Human Rights lawyer who served on the Independent Electoral Commission. The photos are taken inside the voting station whilst most photos of Mandela casting his 'first vote' are taken outside the voting station and are actually of him casting his second vote.

Dollimore, Luke

Lionel Shapiro Collection, 1964, Pretoria: [Set of 7 still images]

  • 1.1.3.2
  • Series
  • 1964-06-12

The photos are taken on 12 June 1964, the day of the verdict in the Rivonia Trial. Lionel Shapiro took the photos whilst studying at Wits and doing pictures once a week for the student paper. Nelson Mandela leaving court in a prison van, protestors, Winnie Mandela and Mandela's mother.

The collection consists of 4 photographs - LS001: Winnie Mandela and Mandela's mother, Nosekeni leaving court; LS002: June Mlangeni leaving the court; LS003: The trialists leaving court after the sentencing in a prison van. Mandela is the first person on the let in the van; and LS004: A supporter outside the court with placard "We are proud of our leaders".

Shapiro, Lionel

Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa

The Canon Collins Trust was founded by the British Defence and Aid Fund (BDAF) in 1981 to assist South African and Namibian refugee students to receive higher education and training. Students received their training in the UK and independent African states. It merged with the Legal Assistance Trust in 2012 and continues to operate as Canon Collins Educational and Legal Assistance Trust.

Anti-Apartheid Movement Austria [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung Osterreich] : [Part 1]

The AAM Austria started in 1977 in response to the Soweto uprisings with a small group of people who lobbied the general public and government to take a stand against apartheid. It organised numerous boycott and solidarity campaigns, pushing the Austrian government to take a more anti-apartheid position. It gave direct support to the liberation movements. Besides solidarity with South Africa, the AAM also worked for Namibia. It was a member of the European anti-apartheid movements group. It dissolved in 1993 to continue as the Southern Africa Documentation and Cooperation Centre (SADOCC).

ANC Support Group

The ANC Support Group was established in 1983 by members of CAASA (Community Aid Abroad Southern Africa); it changed its name to Anti-Apartheid Melbourne in 1984.

Anti-Apartheid, Melbourne : [Part 1]

This group was formed in 1977 to support political prisoners in South Africa financially and became a member of Community Aid Abroad (Southern Africa) (CAASA) in 1979. Core members of CAASA formed the African National Congress Support Group in 1983. In 1984, as a result of Eddie Funde's request, the group became Anti-Apartheid Group (AAG), then the Anti-Apartheid, Melbourne. It became an organisation that supported the liberation movements directly. The group dissolved in 1985.

Australian Council for Overseas Aid

The Australian Council for Overseas Aid (ACFOA) was formed in 1965 as a co-ordinating body for 90 NGOs working in the field of overseas aid and development. The aim of the organisation was to work for social and economic justice and to respond to human needs. It lobbied the Australian government as well as international organisations and overseas governments. It also supported the liberation movements directly. It continues to operate as the Australian Council for International Development.

Campaign Against Racial Exploitation : [Part 1]

The Campaign Against Racial Exploitation (CARE) was a national anti-racist umbrella organisation whose activities focused on anti-apartheid and Australian Aboriginal issues. It was formed in 1973 as the first national anti-apartheid and anti-racism network in Australia, at the suggestion of South African exile Neville Curtis, and formally launched in December 1974. CARE launched many campaigns, including those against South African company Rothmans, as well as Woolworths and Shell, and was prominent in sports boycotts.

Luthuli Group of Canberra

This local anti-apartheid group organised solidarity campaigns with South Africa and Namibia. It gave direct support to the liberation movements. Exact dates of the organisation's existence are not known.

Rivonia Trial

Records of the State versus Nelson Mandela and nine others. Contains: the first and second indictments, bail applications, opening address, index to state witnesses and exhibits. The records of state witnesses are: general, from East London and from Port Elizabeth. Also contains the opening address of the defence, Mandela's statement from the dock, the argument by the state, analysis of defence evidence, the judgement, evidence in mitigation of sentencing and judgement on sentence.

Department of Justice

Anti-Apartheid, Melbourne : [Part 2]

This group was formed in 1977 to support political prisoners in South Africa financially and became a member of Community Aid Abroad (Southern Africa) (CAASA) in 1979. Core members of CAASA formed the African National Congress Support Group in 1983. In 1984, as a result of Eddie Funde's request, the group became Anti-Apartheid Group (AAG), then the Anti-Apartheid, Melbourne. It became an organisation that supported the liberation movements directly. The group dissolved in 1985.

Community Aid Abroad Southern Africa

In 1979 the group formally became a constituent of Community Aid Abroad, under the name Community Aid Abroad (Southern Africa). The core members of CAASA came together in 1983 to form the African National Congress Support Group. The group proclaimed their support for the ANC in the liberation struggle in South Africa. In 1984, as a result of Eddie Funde's request, the group became Anti-Apartheid, Melbourne. It grew rapidly in support and numbers until internal politics and outside pressures caused the group's dissolution in September 1985.

Friends of Africa

Friends of Africa (FOA) was formed in 1967 by two members of the New South Wales branch of the Building Workers’ Industrial Union. The group carried on the work of the Action Committee against Apartheid. The FOA was very active among trade unions and participated in campaigns of other Australian anti-apartheid groups as well. It gave direct support to the liberation movements.

Hazel Rose Jones

Hazel Rose Jones was a lifelong campaigner for social justice who became a leading activist of the Anti-Apartheid Movement in Australia. In 1960 the Sharpeville massacre impelled Jones to the forefront of anti-apartheid activism. In 1967 she became a founding member of Friends of Africa in Sydney. She joined the Executive Committee of the Southern Africa Defence and Aid Fund (SADAF) in December 1970. She served as both Honorary Secretary of SADAF and of its successor, Community Aid Abroad (Australia) (CAASA).

Norwegian Students’ and Academics’ International Assistance Fund

SAIH was established in 1961 and worked with other NGOs and institutions to support projects in Africa and Latin America. It organised local universities and colleges around educational projects and supported many projects from the liberation movements. A substantial amount of their funding came directly from students’ contributions.

Southern Africa Defence and Aid Fund in Australia

The Southern Africa Defence and Aid Fund in Australia (SADAF) was founded in 1963 by a small group of South-African post-Sharpeville refugees and several interested Australians. SADAF’s main aims were to aid and defend the victims of unjust legislation and oppression in South Africa, including support for families and dependents of victims and to keep the conscience of the world alive to the issues at stake. SADAF was affiliated to the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). In 1981 SADAF was dissolved and reconvened as the Community Aid Abroad Southern Africa (CAASA). Like its predecessor, CAASA maintained close ties with Campaign against Racial Exploitation (CARE). CAASA folded in 1987.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 3]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

Life Under Apartheid Collection

The programmes and documents in this collection illustrate what life was like for ordinary South Africans under Apartheid, as well as documenting key political moments.

Items related directly to the Rivonia Trial:
-BBC Television programme: Panorama: Race Problems Around the World. The documentary deals with the growth of racial tension in the Britain and the USA as Mandela is imprisoned for life. This programme was first broadcast on 15 June 1964. 50 minutes, 25 seconds in length. Contains a report by Robin Day from Pretoria where Mandela and others have been sentenced in the Rivonia Trial. Includes interviews with those who condemn the trial and sentencing: Helen Suzman, Alan Paton, Winnie Mandela.
-Letter from a cameraman about "Panorama" programme (28 June 19964). This letter was sent by Ernest Christie to the series producer David Wheeler on South African press reaction to Robin Day's segment in the "Panorama: Race Problems Around the World" which he had filmed.

British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Action Committee on Southern Africa [Actie Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika] : [Part 1]

AKZA was a national organisation based in the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium. It operated from 1972-1991 and developed out of progressive student organisations. It started as the Flemish Angola Committee and supported the liberation movements directly. They organised numerous boycott campaigns and was instrumental in the formation of the largest social action coalition in Flanders, the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (Vlaamse Anti-Apartheid Koalitie - VAAK). It also collaborated with other AAMs and was part of the Liaison Group of Anti-Apartheid Movements within the European Community (known as the Liaison Group).

Oxfam Solidarity Belgium [Oxfam Solidariteit Belgi

Oxfam Solidarity Belgium started in 1964 as an organisation geared towards solidarity with struggles for self-determination. It was made up of three separate sections, and it was the Oxfam Solidarity section that joined anti-apartheid activities from around 1973 till 1994. Oxfam mainly joined campaigns organised by the Committee against Colonialism and Apartheid and the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (VAAK) but also organised its own demonstrations against apartheid. It was very active in the fruit boycott campaign and the campaigns against banks with ties with South Africa. It supported the Kagiso Trust Fund and the ANC office in Brussels.

Peace [Vrede]

Peace was a national organisation that operated from approximately 1971 to 1985. It participated in the boycott campaigns and the activities of the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (Vlaamse Anti-Apartheid Koalitie - VAAK) and Boycott Apartheid.

Brazilian Committee of Solidarity with the Peoples of South Africa and Namibia [Comit

The Brazilian Committee of Solidarity with the Peoples of South Africa and Namibia (ComAfrica) started in 1985 as a bridge from academic research to action by civil society. It had strong links with the labour movement and the Black Movement (Movimento Negro) in Brazil. It organised information campaigns and support for the recognition of the liberation movements ANC and SWAPO. It organised political tours of Brazil for members of the liberation movements and co-founded the Nelson Mandela Reception Committee in 1990. In 2000 the organisation changed its name to Instituto ComAfrica.

Institute of African Studies [Instituto de Estudos Africanos de Rio de Janeiro]

The Institute of African Studies (INEAFRIC) started in 1981 and participated in United Nations activities to support the independence of Namibia and the elimination of apartheid in South Africa. Its work led to the formation of COMAFRICA. It provided academic research and debate in the field of international relations and organised seminars.

Southern African Development Coordination Conference

The Southern African Development Coordination Conference (SADCC), which was the forerunner of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), was formed in Lusaka, Zambia, on 1 April 1980. It grew from the Frontline States, an alliance of countries in Southern Africa formed in 1970 to aid the liberation movements in South Africa and Namibia and to form a front against apartheid. Some of the main goals of the SADCC were to lessen the dependency on apartheid South Africa and to introduce programmes and projects which would influence the Southern African region. It was renamed SADC in 1992.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) has produced numerous programmes about apartheid and the activities of Canadians against apartheid. Its first anti-apartheid programme dates back to 1961, and covers the Sharpeville massacre of 1960.

Canada and the Fight Against Apartheid

  • CA CBC-DA MR-RT-145
  • Collection
  • 1960 - 1999
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Series of radio and television reports on South Africa broadcast from the 1960s through the first democratic elections in 1994. Items related to the Rivonia Trial are:
-Escaped lawyer describes apartheid's brutal laws (from CBC Radio, Nov. 17, 1964): Harold Wolpe defended oppressed blacks until he was imprisoned. Guest: Harold Wolpe, host: Bob Wilson, narrator: Paul Wright, duration: 25:57
-Mandela and seven colleagues sentenced colleagues sentenced (from CBC Radio, National Radio News, June 12, 1964): Reporter Patrick Keatley is in London to explain why the defendants likely avoided a death sentence. Host: Alex Trebek, reporter: Patrick Keatley, duration: 2:58.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)

Human Rights Internet

The HRI in Ottawa has been serving as an unofficial repository for the documentation of NGOs throughout the world. It makes a vast amount of material available and brings together a wide variety of reports on human rights issues, which would otherwise be very difficult to locate, obtain and consult. The collection which HRI has amassed over the years includes publications by more than 350 NGOs, and includes a number of AAMs.

Anglican Church of Canada : [Part 1]

The Anglican Church of Canada took a very active stand against apartheid. In the late 1980s, Archbishop Ted Scott served on the Commonwealth of Nations ‘Eminent Persons Group’ which advocated the implementation of sanctions against South Africa.

Anti-Apartheid Movement Austria [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung Osterreich] : [Part 5]

The AAM Austria started in 1977 in response to the Soweto uprisings with a small group of people who lobbied the general public and government to take a stand against apartheid. It organised numerous boycott and solidarity campaigns, pushing the Austrian government to take a more anti-apartheid position. It gave direct support to the liberation movements. Besides solidarity with South Africa, the AAM also worked for Namibia. It was a member of the European anti-apartheid movements group. It dissolved in 1993 to continue as the Southern Africa Documentation and Cooperation Centre (SADOCC).

Free South Africa Committee

The Free South Africa Committee operated in Edmonton. It was a community-based organisation that supported the boycott of South Africa and was also involved in direct material support of the liberation movements in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. It was especially active in schools in Edmonton.

League for Socialist Action : Canada

The League for Socialist Action was the biggest Trotskyist organisation active in Canada. It was formed in 1961 when the Socialist Education League merged with the Socialist Information Centre. One of LSA's many activities included participating in solidarity campaigns with South Africa. The LSA disbanded in 1977 when it merged with the Revolutionary Marxist Group, the Quebec-based Groupe Marxiste Revolutionnaire, and the Ligue Socialiste Ouvrière to form the Revolutionary Workers League/Ligue Ouvrière Révolutionnaire.

Organisation of Solidarity with the Peoples of Africa, Asia and Latin America [Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina] : [Part 3]

OSPAAAL was established following the Tricontinental Conference held in Havana, January 1966, to promote "solidarity with the Third World people's struggles, claims and most precious desires". The organisation supported struggles against colonialism and apartheid, and notably produced a large number of brightly coloured propaganda posters to promote its cause.

Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility : [Part 1]

The Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR) was established in 1975 as a coalition of Canadian Churches. It worked towards social responsibility in Canadian based corporations and financial institutions. It supported the South African Council of Churches (SACC) proposal for a code of business ethics for companies operating in South Africa. It campaigned strongly to end loans to the apartheid regime and approached shareholders to accomplish this. In 2001, TCCR became part of KAIROS Canada.

International Labour Organisation

The ILO is a specialised agency of the UN, and was founded in 1919 to work for the betterment of people in their place of work under conditions of freedom, equity, security and human dignity. It organised numerous conferences on South Africa and apartheid and was active on boycott issues related to workers’ rights.

Country Committee for South Africa Action [Landskomiteen Sydafrika-Aktion] (Danish Anti Apartheid Movement) : [Part 2]

The Country Committee for South Africa Action (LSA) was formed in 1978 by several organisations and political parties. It was one of the first organisations to co-ordinate campaigns at the local level. It organised several information campaigns involving speaking tours of ANC members as well as cultural events. It continues to operate as Africa Contact.

Programme to Combat Racism : World Council of Churches : [Part 1]

The Programme to Combat Racism started in 1968 as part of the WCC Programme Unit on Justice and Service. Its aim was to develop policies and programmes contributing to the liberation of victims of racism. Much of its attention and focus was on southern Africa, especially apartheid and the divestment campaign. It established a special fund from which donations to liberation movements were made and to solidarity organisations around the world.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 3]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 2]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

The UNHCR is the UN agency for the protection and care of refugees. It started to operate in 1950, based on the Geneva Refugee Convention. Besides playing a role in improving the status of refugees through international agreements and measures at national level, it also works at a practical level. It supported various anti-apartheid liberation movements.

Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung] : [Part 1]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany (AAB) operated from 1974 till 1994. It was formed on the initiative of the Mainz Working Group on Southern Africa (MAKSA). It was very active in the campaigns against the arms trade with South Africa, the release of Nelson Mandela, as well as the fruit, sport, Royal Dutch Shell and cultural boycott. It consisted of a network of local groups and worked with a variety of peace and religious organisations. In the late 1970s/early 1980s it used shareholders meetings (by buying shares) to pressurise banks not to deal with South Africa and pressured the Federal government to take an active anti-apartheid position. The AAB also participated in the Liaison Group. In May 1994 the AAB changed its name to Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis, which continued to carry out solidarity work with Southern Africa. Since the end of August 2001, Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis was dissolved and Koordination Südliches Afrika (KOSA, Co-ordination for Southern Africa) became the successor organisation.

Evangelical Women’s Group Germany [Evangelische Frauenarbeit in Deutschland - Frauen gegen Apartheid] : [Part 1]

This women’s group of the Protestant churches started its activities in 1977 with a boycott of South African fruit and established Frauen gegen Apartheid. It operated till 1993. It also campaigned against the Krugerrand and bank loans. For 15 years, they organised a vigil every Thursday in front of the South African Consulate.

World University Service - Denmark [Solidaritet og Bistand]

The World University Service Denmark (WUS-D) started in 1966 as part of WUS International. It became independent in 1970. It started its solidarity activities in 1966 and became a member of the Anti-Apartheid Committee. It supported the liberation movements in Southern Africa. It distributed funds to the South African Committee for Higher Education (SACHED) and other bursary programmes. WUS continues its activities now as IBIS.

Country Committee for South Africa Action [Landskomiteen Sydafrika-Aktion] (Danish Anti Apartheid Movement) : [Part 1]

The Country Committee for South Africa Action (LSA) was formed in 1978 by several organisations and political parties. It was one of the first organisations to co-ordinate campaigns at the local level. It organised several information campaigns involving speaking tours of ANC members as well as cultural events. It continues to operate as Africa Contact.

South Africa Contact [Sydafrika Kontakt]

South Africa Contact was founded in 1978 by several political parties, trade unions and other organisations to work against colonialism and oppression in Southern Africa. After the liberation of Angola, Mozambique and Zimbabwe it concentrated its activities towards establishing an economic and cultural boycott of South Africa.

Digital National Security Archive

The Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) is affiliated with the National Security Archive. DNSA holds a document collection of US government responses to historical events in South Africa. The primary source documents deal with most aspects of US policy towards apartheid South Africa, including sanctions, embargoes and nuclear collaboration.

Organisation of African Unity

The OAU was founded in 1963 to work towards unity and solidarity amongst African countries and act as a collective voice for the African continent. It worked towards the eradication of all forms of colonialism. The OAU's Coordinating Committee for the Liberation of Africa (Liberation Committee) organised diplomatic support and channeled financial, military and logistical aid to liberation movements. The OAU was disbanded in 2002 and replaced by the African Union (AU).

Finnish Africa Committee

The FAC started in 1970 and organised information campaigns for trade unions, and political parties. It established, together with the Finnish Peace Committee, the fundraising organisation Peace Fund in 1973 to support liberation movements in Southern Africa. It focused more and more on apartheid as from the late 1970s and organised boycott campaigns.

Movement Against Racism and for Friendship Among Peoples [Mouvement Contre le Racisme et pour l'Amitié entre les Peuples]

MRAP was established in 1941 under the name Mouvement National Contre le Racisme (National Movement Against Racism) as a general anti-racism organisation. It changed its name to MRAP in 1949. It worked with other national and international organisations on anti-apartheid campaigns.

National Gathering against Apartheid [Rencontre National contre l’Apartheid] : [Part 1]

RNCA was a national organisation which started in the 1970s as L’Association Française d’Amitié avec les Peuples d’Afrique (AFASPA). AFASPA was created by trade unionists and anti-colonialists and most of it activities were focused on the French colonies. In 1986 RNCA was formed by AFASPA to focus solely on anti-apartheid activities. In the beginning it mainly worked towards the implementation of sanctions, but it later became a strong supporter of the ANC office in Paris. RNCA continues to operate as Rencontre National avec le People d’Afrique du Sud (RENAPAS).

National Gathering against Apartheid [Rencontre National contre l’Apartheid] : [Part 2]

RNCA was a national organisation which started in the 1970s as L’Association Française d’Amitié avec les Peuples d’Afrique (AFASPA). AFASPA was created by trade unionists and anti-colonialists and most of it activities were focused on the French colonies. In 1986 RNCA was formed by AFASPA to focus solely on anti-apartheid activities. In the beginning it mainly worked towards the implementation of sanctions, but it later became a strong supporter of the ANC office in Paris. RNCA continues to operate as Rencontre National avec le People d’Afrique du Sud (RENAPAS).

Mandela

Political biography of Nelson Mandela and his unique role in the liberation struggle in South Africa. Includes archive material of the Treason trial, the Rivonia trial and a filmed interview while underground. Directed by Lionel Ngakane and Niven Howie. Produced by Divemay Films. Edited by Julia Beer.

Untitled

British Library Newspaper Collection

Collections includes all UK national daily and Sunday newspapers from 1801 to the present, most UK and Irish regional and local newspapers, selected newspapers from around the world in European languages, a range of UK and Irish popular periodicals, mostly published weekly and fortnightly.

These would include coverage of the Rivonia Trial.

Untitled

African Writers' Club: BBC Africa Services Collection

Talk about the struggle of black people of South Africa living under apartheid. The speaker talks about the role of the African National Congress (ANC) in the fight for freedom. The names of many freedom fighters are listed. There is also a detailed discussion about the 'Rivonia Treason Trial'.

British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Rivonia Trial, South Africa, 1963-4: Nelson Mandela Dictabelt Dubbings

Dubbings of seven dictabelts loaned by the National Archives of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa, of court recordings made at the Court of Justice in Pretoria on 20 April 1964. The blue 'dictabelts' are a type of audio recording, developed by the Dictaphone company, which was mainly used in offices between the 1940s and the 1960s. The short broad plastic belts were capable of being flattened and posted but could not be wiped and reused. It appears that the whole Rivonia Trial was recorded on dictabelts in line with normal court procedure at the time. These dubbings comprise only the opening of the defence case by Defence Counsel Bram Fischer, followed by interjections from Justice Quartus de Wet and Prosecutor Percy Yutar, then a three-hour speech by Accused Number One (Nelson Mandela). Extracts from the recordings have been published by SABC entitled 'The voice of Nelson Mandela: extracts from famous speeches', SABC/EMI, 2002 (EMI 724353736521; NSA shelfmark 1CD0189137).

Transcripts available.

Untitled

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 1]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

Hackney Trades Council

The Hackney Trades Council was a trade union organisation that was involved in a wide variety of local and national campaigns and issues, including the anti-apartheid movement.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 1]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

British Defence and Aid Fund Southern Africa : [Part 2]

BDAF was the forerunner of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). It started life as an initiative of Canon Collins to merge all the Christian Aid funds for South Africa sometime between 1958 and 1961. Its role was to raise funds for the legal defence of political prisoners, and for their families, and later to raise public consciousness in the UK for the international organisation.

Christian Aid : [Part 3]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Trades Union Congress : [Part 2]

The TUC is a federation of trade unions in the UK which started in 1868. It gave direct support to unions in South Africa and was active in boycott campaigns nationally and internationally.

Africa Bureau : [Part 1]

The Africa Bureau was set up in 1952 by, amongst others, Mary Benson and Rev. Michael Scott, and operated until 1978. It was active in the area of international sanctions and worked with the AAM in the 1960s. It later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational Trust.
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