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''Peace Bench" at the UN Plaza unveiled in honour of Nelson Mandela

As a symbol of diplomacy and dialogue, the installation pays tribute to Nelson Mandela and his efforts to bring people together to find effective solutions for peace. The installation will remain at the Headquarters’ plaza through September 2018, when the plan is to transfer it to Oslo and a permanent location near the Nobel Peace Center and the Oslo City Hall.

A. Philip Randolph

Mr A. Philip Randolph, an African American labour and civil rights activist, was a member of the Committee of Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), founded in 1952 to support the Defiance Campaign. He was also a member of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and headed the Committee on Conscience against Apartheid, formed by ACOA. He was very active in the End Loans campaigns.

Action Committee on Southern Africa [Actie Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika] : [Part 1]

AKZA was a national organisation based in the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium. It operated from 1972-1991 and developed out of progressive student organisations. It started as the Flemish Angola Committee and supported the liberation movements directly. They organised numerous boycott campaigns and was instrumental in the formation of the largest social action coalition in Flanders, the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (Vlaamse Anti-Apartheid Koalitie - VAAK). It also collaborated with other AAMs and was part of the Liaison Group of Anti-Apartheid Movements within the European Community (known as the Liaison Group).

Africa Centre

The Africa Centre was established in 1964 in London to create awareness about developments in Africa. Leading African artists, writers, politicians and musicians met at the centre and it served as a platform by organising evenings with theatre and discussions.

Africa Educational Trust

The Africa Educational Trust (AET) was founded in 1958. Originally it was part of the Africa Bureau, which later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational and Publication Trust. The main aim was to help exiles and refugees with their education.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Groups of Sweden [Afrikagrupperna] : [Part 1]

The AGS was formed in 1974 by several local Africa groups, some of them already active in the early 1960s. It gave unconditional support to the liberation struggle. It began its work by supporting the struggles in the Portuguese colonies and continued to work on Southern Africa lobbying the Swedish government to institute sanctions. It initiated the establishment of the Isolate South Africa Committee (ISAK). In 1992 the AGS merged with the Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation / Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation, and continues to operate as Afrikagrupperna.

Africa Groups of Sweden [Afrikagrupperna] : [Part 2]

The AGS was formed in 1974 by several local Africa groups, some of them already active in the early 1960s. It gave unconditional support to the liberation struggle. It began its work by supporting the struggles in the Portuguese colonies and continued to work on Southern Africa lobbying the Swedish government to institute sanctions. It initiated the establishment of the Isolate South Africa Committee (ISAK). In 1992 the AGS merged with the Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation / Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation, and continues to operate as Afrikagrupperna.

Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation [Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation]

The ARO was initiated by the AGS 1978, initially to recruit health care workers, teachers and administrators to work in the former Portuguese colonies. It expanded its work to ANC camps and schools and was active in these areas until 1992. When apartheid ended and Namibia became independent, ARO’s main task became to support the reconstruction of South Africa and Namibia. As a consequence, the activities of ARO and the Africa Groups of Sweden became similar, and the organisations merged in 1992 under the name the Africa Groups of Sweden (Afrikagrupperna).

African Skies : [Part 1]

African Skies is a foundation for audio-visual archives and productions on Southern Africa. African Skies was founded in 1995, shortly after the first democratic elections in South Africa in 1994. The roots of African Skies can be found in the Dutch Anti-Apartheid Movement. The Dutch AAM facilitated and sponsored the foundation of African Skies.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Amnesty International Netherlands

Amnesty International (AI) Netherlands started in 1968 and was mainly active around issues concerning political prisoners, the death sentence and other human rights violations in South Africa.

Amnesty International USA

The AI-USA started in the early 1960s and has several offices in the country. It is an affiliate of AI- International Secretariat and bases its activities on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The campaigns concentrate on the rights of political prisoners and unfair trials, working towards the release of prisoners of conscience.

Anglican Church of Canada : [Part 1]

The Anglican Church of Canada took a very active stand against apartheid. In the late 1980s, Archbishop Ted Scott served on the Commonwealth of Nations ‘Eminent Persons Group’ which advocated the implementation of sanctions against South Africa.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 3]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany (AAB) operated from 1974 till 1994. It was formed on the initiative of the Mainz Working Group on Southern Africa (MAKSA). It was very active in the campaigns against the arms trade with South Africa, the release of Nelson Mandela, as well as the fruit, sport, Royal Dutch Shell and cultural boycott. It consisted of a network of local groups and worked with a variety of peace and religious organisations. In the late 1970s/early 1980s it used shareholders meetings (by buying shares) to pressurise banks not to deal with South Africa and pressured the Federal government to take an active anti-apartheid position. The AAB also participated in the Liaison Group. In May 1994 the AAB changed its name to Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis, which continued to carry out solidarity work with Southern Africa. Since the end of August 2001, Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis was dissolved and Koordination Südliches Afrika (KOSA, Co-ordination for Southern Africa) became the successor organisation.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 2]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Campaign Against Racial Exploitation : [Part 2]

The Campaign Against Racial Exploitation (CARE) was a national anti-racist umbrella organisation whose activities focused on anti-apartheid and Australian Aboriginal issues. It was formed in 1973 as the first national anti-apartheid and anti-racism network in Australia, at the suggestion of South African exile Neville Curtis, and formally launched in December 1974. CARE launched many campaigns, including those against South African company Rothmans, as well as Woolworths and Shell, and was prominent in sports boycotts.
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