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46664 Dinner, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on 46664 Dinner in a marquee, Champaign served and music entertains the guests arrival Nelson Mandela arrives with Graca Machel, crowd standing up clapping of hands and cheering. Gordon Brown speech, then welcomes Bill Clinton. Clinton Speech, Nelson Mandela speech thanks the people for the continued support on the fight against AIDS, poverty and deprivation...it’s in your hands…

Giant Media

46664 London Concert, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on Aerial view of the 46664 London concert venue. Crowd waits outside, barriers removed crowd starts moving inside the venue. Crowd moving in and being scanned. Inside the venue crowd running towards the stage. Cops around installations. Press room with journalists reporting on the concert, signed messages for Nelson Mandela, VIP’s coming in. Nelson Mandela’s car coming in.

Giant Media

46664 London Concert, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on Achmat still organising, interview explaining the 46664 programme and the organisations that will benefit from the proceeds of the concerts. Artists/ Musicians introduced to Achmat Dangor and Shaun Johnson. Nelson Mandela arrives with Zelda La Grange to meet and greet the artists. Nelson Mandela and the artists group photo opportunity. Photo with individual artists. Nelson Mandela leaves with Zelda and Sean the security guard.

Giant Media

46664 London Concert, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on 46664 London Concert- Achmat Dangor in London working on finding accommodation for the Mandela grandchildren who will be attending the concert. Securing tickets for dignitaries the Mayor of London including the Kinnocks. Behind the scenes work with Tim Massey and artists who will be performing, planning and organising for the London concert

Giant Media

46664 London Concert, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on focusing on behind scenes work for the London concert, team of Nelson Mandela body guards waiting at the hotel, Achmat Dangor securing of tickets for the Nelson Mandela Foundation board members. Ticket collection by the prospective attendees of the conference.

Giant Media

Africa Bureau : [Part 1]

The Africa Bureau was set up in 1952 by, amongst others, Mary Benson and Rev. Michael Scott, and operated until 1978. It was active in the area of international sanctions and worked with the AAM in the 1960s. It later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational Trust.

Africa Bureau : [Part 2]

The Africa Bureau was set up in 1952 by, amongst others, Mary Benson and Rev. Michael Scott, and operated until 1978. It was active in the area of international sanctions and worked with the AAM in the 1960s. It later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational Trust.

Africa Centre

The Africa Centre was established in 1964 in London to create awareness about developments in Africa. Leading African artists, writers, politicians and musicians met at the centre and it served as a platform by organising evenings with theatre and discussions.

Africa Educational Trust

The Africa Educational Trust (AET) was founded in 1958. Originally it was part of the Africa Bureau, which later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational and Publication Trust. The main aim was to help exiles and refugees with their education.

Africa and Its Position in the World Today

  • ZA COM MR-S-1579
  • Item
  • 2000-04-06
  • Part of Speeches

Mandela was attending the The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 1995 held in Auckland, New Zealand, between 10 November 1995 and 13 November 1995

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

African National Congress Papers

The collection of the African National Congress includes the Defiance Campaign, the Treason trial. ANC leaders in exile and in prison.

African National Congress (ANC)

African Writers' Club: BBC Africa Services Collection

Talk about the struggle of black people of South Africa living under apartheid. The speaker talks about the role of the African National Congress (ANC) in the fight for freedom. The names of many freedom fighters are listed. There is also a detailed discussion about the 'Rivonia Treason Trial'.

British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 1]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 2]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 3]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 4]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Anthony Sampson

Papers of Anthony Sampson has a section on "Materials relating to Mandela: The authorised biography.'' This material comprises of research notes made by Sampson it ranges from photocopies and papers, mainly relating to Nelson Mandela’s life. The collection also has audio visual material.

Sampson, Anthony

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 1]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 2]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 3]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 4]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 1]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 2]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 3]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Archbishop Trevor Huddleston

Trevor Huddleston collection includes correspondence on Nelson Mandela, speeches, addresses, newspaper cuttings , Free Mandela Campaigns and 1990 concert . Celebration of the Nelson Mandela's 70th birthday held at Wembley Stadium. Includes correspondence and papers relating to a service celebrating the release of Nelson Mandela (broadcast February 1990).
Audio visual collection, metering on the inauguration of Nelson Mandela. BBC program on Nelson Mandela as president of South Africa.

Huddleston, Trevor

Archive of the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM)

Archive of the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) and predecessor material including the Boycott Movement. Material directly related to the Rivonia Trial includes:
O.7 Political Prisoners Campaigns, 1956-95:
-O.7.1.b Correspondence, 1962-70: Correspondence concerning the Rivonia trialists and other condemned South African leaders, 1964 (MSS AAM 1791)
-O.7.5.e General files, 1961-95: Information on the Rivonia trial and trialists, 1963-90 (MSS AAM 1953)

W.2 African National Congress (ANC) posters, 1978-95:
'We salute our leaders. Sentenced to life imprisonment. Rivonia 1963. Mandela, Sisulu, Mbeki, Mhlaba, Motsoaledi, Mlangeni, Kathrada, Goldberg.' 1980s? Mainly black and white; photographs (MSS AAM 2512/2/4), 1 poster

Rivonia Trial references might also appear in other parts of this collection for example, the campaigns the AAM took relating to the Trial might appear in the minutes of the Executive Committee and in annual reports.

British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM)

Arrivals for the Mandela Trial

Mr. Nelson Mandela former Transvaal president of the banned African National Congress, appeared in court on charges of incitement and leaving South Africa illegally. The trial transferred from Johannesburg to Pretoria on security grounds. The trial was adjourned for a week to give Mr. Mandela time to appoint defense counsel. Mr Mandela was remanded in custody. Mr Mandela was dressed in tribal dress. Attending the trial was his wife, Mrs. Winnie Mandela and his sister, Ms Leabi Mandela. The courtroom packed with supporters of Mr. Mandela, Mr Mandela that his counsel was unable to appear for him because he was confined to Johannesburg under the suppression of Communism act. Mr. Mandela said the sudden transfer of the trial to Pretoria had deprived him of his attorney services. 17 October 1962

Bernie Grant

Bernie Grant collection documents the concerns of numerous oppressed peoples of and diverse communities the material includes an official invitation and programme to the inauguration of Nelson Mandela, footage and newspaper articles.

Grant, Bernie

Birmingham Anti-Apartheid Movement

Birmingham Anti-Apartheid Movement was formed around 1966 and was very active in the consumer boycott. It started twinning projects with the ANC in the Western Transvaal and organised an annual ‘Soweto Walk’ to raise funds.

Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust

The South Africa Racial Amity Trust (SARAT), launched in 1966, was the predecessor of The Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust (BART). SARAT aimed to promote knowledge about apartheid through research and publications. It paid special attention to the plight of children under apartheid. It was renamed BART in 1980 in honour of its treasurer. It was dissolved in 1996.

Black Theatre Forum (BTF)

Malcolm Frederick folder includes a letter to Whoopee Goldberg and Nelson Mandela's response to Miriam Makeba regarding the Children of Africa charity event.

Brent Council awarded Nelson Mandela the Freedom of the Borough in recognition of his lifelong connection with the borough

Mandela addressed the Willesden Trades Council in 1962. The honour was supposed to have been conferred in April 1990 when Mandela visited Brent but it failed to get the necessary support. Hence this was only done in 2013.
See https://wembleymatters.blogspot.com/2019/01/i-am-pleased-to-kick-off-new-year-with.html

British Defence and Aid Fund Southern Africa : [Part 1]

BDAF was the forerunner of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). It started life as an initiative of Canon Collins to merge all the Christian Aid funds for South Africa sometime between 1958 and 1961. Its role was to raise funds for the legal defence of political prisoners, and for their families, and later to raise public consciousness in the UK for the international organisation.

British Defence and Aid Fund Southern Africa : [Part 2]

BDAF was the forerunner of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). It started life as an initiative of Canon Collins to merge all the Christian Aid funds for South Africa sometime between 1958 and 1961. Its role was to raise funds for the legal defence of political prisoners, and for their families, and later to raise public consciousness in the UK for the international organisation.

British Library Newspaper Collection

Collections includes all UK national daily and Sunday newspapers from 1801 to the present, most UK and Irish regional and local newspapers, selected newspapers from around the world in European languages, a range of UK and Irish popular periodicals, mostly published weekly and fortnightly.

These would include coverage of the Rivonia Trial.

Untitled

Campaign Against Arms Trade

The Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) was established in 1974 by several peace and other organisations concerned about the growing arms trade. It is a broad coalition of organisations working towards ending the arms trade. It works through local groups and networks and organises demonstrations and campaigns.

Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa

The Canon Collins Trust was founded by the British Defence and Aid Fund (BDAF) in 1981 to assist South African and Namibian refugee students to receive higher education and training. Students received their training in the UK and independent African states. It merged with the Legal Assistance Trust in 2012 and continues to operate as Canon Collins Educational and Legal Assistance Trust.

Christian Aid : [Part 1]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Christian Aid : [Part 2]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Christian Aid : [Part 3]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Christian Concern for Southern Africa

Christian Concern for Southern Africa (CCSA) was founded in 1972 as an interdenominational Christian body concerned with raising awareness of the political situation in South Africa and to co-ordinate the response of British Churches. In particular, the involvement of oil companies was targeted leading to the establishment of the Oil Working Group in 1979. The organisation also worked towards sanctions against South Africa, and provided an Ethical Investment Research Service. It was dissolved in 1993.

City of London Anti-Apartheid Group (City Group) : [Part 1]

The City of London Anti-Apartheid Group was a breakaway group of the national AAM, founded in 1982 by Norma Kitson, and allied to the Revolutionary Communist Group. City Group developed a close working relationship not only with the ANC and SWAPO, but also with the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), AZAPO, and Black Consciousness supporters. In 1985 City Group was expelled from the national AAM, and from 1986 - 1990 its supporters maintained a Non-Stop Picket outside the South African Embassy in Trafalgar Square calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. The City Group archives provide an opportunity to understand a different perspective on the international anti-apartheid movement.

City of London Anti-Apartheid Group (City Group) : [Part 2]

The City of London Anti-Apartheid Group was a breakaway group of the national AAM, founded in 1982 by Norma Kitson, and allied to the Revolutionary Communist Group. City Group developed a close working relationship not only with the ANC and SWAPO, but also with the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), AZAPO, and Black Consciousness supporters. In 1985 City Group was expelled from the national AAM, and from 1986 - 1990 its supporters maintained a Non-Stop Picket outside the South African Embassy in Trafalgar Square calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. The City Group archives provide an opportunity to understand a different perspective on the international anti-apartheid movement.

Committee on South African War Resistance : [Part 1]

COSAWR was founded in 1978 by South African draft (military service) resisters active in the UK. It was a self-help organisation for those escaping conscription in the SADF and to support those who were resisting conscription within the country. It raised the issue of militarism in South Africa and conducted research into the South African military structure and resistance to it. COSAWR established a presence in several other European countries. Its magazine 'Resister' became the leading magazine on South Africa's militarisation.

Committee on South African War Resistance : [Part 2]

COSAWR was founded in 1978 by South African draft (military service) resisters active in the UK. It was a self-help organisation for those escaping conscription in the SADF and to support those who were resisting conscription within the country. It raised the issue of militarism in South Africa and conducted research into the South African military structure and resistance to it. COSAWR established a presence in several other European countries. Its magazine 'Resister' became the leading magazine on South Africa's militarisation.

Commonwealth Office

Records of the Commonwealth Office and Foreign Commonwealth Office: Southern African Department and predecessors includes material on the Treatment of prisoners including Nelson Mandela in South Africa

Commonwealth Pressure Groups, Trade Unions and Political Parties Materials

The Institute of Commonwealth Studies at the University of London has three big collections covering pressure groups, trade unions and political parties within the Commonwealth. The collections started in 1960 and have a special emphasis on primary materials. Besides printed materials, the collections also contain posters, badges, and stickers. Anti-apartheid activities are covered in the collections.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 1]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 2]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 3]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.
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