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Washington Office on Africa

The Washington Office on Africa (WOA) was founded in 1972 to support the movement for freedom from white-minority rule in southern Africa. It was initially sponsored by five organisations including the American Committee on Africa. It grew out of the Washington Office of the American Committee on Africa, which was established in 1967. Churches and labour unions supported the organisation to work with the Congress on Southern Africa legislation. The Washington Office on Africa Educational Fund (WOAEF) was established as the educational division of WOA.

United Nations

The UN is an international organisation that aims to facilitate cooperation in international law, security, economic development, social progress, human rights and achieving world peace. It was founded in 1945 and replaced the League of Nations. It has been concerned with the issue of racial discrimination since its beginning and racism became an important item on the United Nations agenda after African nations attained independence and after the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa in 1960. The Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1963), which led to the International Convention in 1965. It proclaimed the International Year for Action to Combat Racial Discrimination in 1971 and the three Decades for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination in 1973. Besides the specialised agencies on apartheid, several other agencies of the UN were also involved in anti-apartheid and solidarity activities.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 2]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 3]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

TransAfrica

Transafrica was founded in 1977 as the African American Lobby on Africa and the Caribbean. It worked closely with the Congressional Black Caucus and was active in divestments, boycott and other campaigns. It organised and participated in sit-ins in the office of the South African ambassador in Washington, followed by demonstrations outside South African embassies and consulates, organised by what became the Free South Africa Movement (FSAM).

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 1]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 4]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

Southern Africa Support Project

The SASP started in 1978 as a community-based organisation in Washington DC in support of the liberation struggles in Southern Africa. It gave political and material support to the liberation movements and was involved in fundraising and educational campaigns.

Southern Africa Liberation Committee

The SALC was a community organisation based at Michigan State University (MSU). It operated from 1973-1997, and was active at MSU and in the greater East Lansing area. It organised a number of successful educational and social action campaigns, and was very active in lobbying for divestment, consumer boycotts and no-loans to South Africa.

Prexy Nesbitt : [Part 2]

Prexy Nesbitt is an activist and academic from Chicago who was active in the struggle to end apartheid and worked to end colonialism in Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia. He founded the Antioch Committee for a Free South Africa, which succeeded after a ten-year campaign to achieve the divestment of Antioch College’s holdings from companies involved with apartheid. Nesbitt worked for the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) where he coordinated the National Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa from 1976-1979. From 1979-1983 he was Program Director for the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches in Geneva. He has also worked for the Institute for Policy Studies, the American Friends Service Committee and Africa Action.

Prexy Nesbitt : [Part 1]

Prexy Nesbitt is an activist and academic from Chicago who was active in the struggle to end apartheid and worked to end colonialism in Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia. He founded the Antioch Committee for a Free South Africa, which succeeded after a ten-year campaign to achieve the divestment of Antioch College’s holdings from companies involved with apartheid. Nesbitt worked for the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) where he coordinated the National Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa from 1976-1979. From 1979-1983 he was Program Director for the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches in Geneva. He has also worked for the Institute for Policy Studies, the American Friends Service Committee and Africa Action.

Lutheran World Ministries : Office on World Community : [Part 1]

The LWM Office on World Community was established in 1973 as a joint project of the National Committee of the Lutheran World Federation (USANC) and the Lutheran Council in the USA. LWM/Office on World Community supported the struggle for independence in Namibia, opposed apartheid in South Africa, and worked with and provided assistance to the South West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) and US and international organisations against apartheid. In 1987, LWM was terminated with the establishment of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Lutheran World Ministries : Office on World Community : [Part 2]

The LWM Office on World Community was established in 1973 as a joint project of the National Committee of the Lutheran World Federation (USANC) and the Lutheran Council in the USA. LWM/Office on World Community supported the struggle for independence in Namibia, opposed apartheid in South Africa, and worked with and provided assistance to the South West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) and US and international organisations against apartheid. In 1987, LWM was terminated with the establishment of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Madison Anti-Apartheid Coalition

The Madison Anti-Apartheid Coalition started at the Madison Area Committee on Southern Africa and was active from 1968-1992. It was a student organisation at the University of Wisconsin to lobby and educate the community about South Africa, and to support the liberation movements.

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights under Law (Southern Africa Project) : [Part 2]

The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law was created at the request of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. It provided legal representation in political and quasi-political trials in South Africa. It sent out alerts to organisations in the US and to State Department officials concerning human rights violations.

International Council for Equality of Opportunity Principles

The ICEOP was founded in 1977 to promote social justice in South Africa. Reverend LH Sullivan devised a set of principles for companies conducting business in South Africa. This voluntary business code became known as the ‘Sullivan Principles’. The code required an annual independent evaluation of individual business activities in South Africa. The results were published in the public domain. The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and other anti-apartheid organisations disapproved of the ‘Sullivan Principles’ since it provided companies with a way out of the boycott.

International Defense and Aid Fund for Southern Africa- United States Committee

The US-IDAF was established in 1972. In addition to raising funds for legal defense of prisoners and aid for their dependents, it also disseminated information about conditions in Southern Africa and supported boycotts and other solidarity actions. It grew out of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). US-IDAF executive director Kenneth N. Carstens was also instrumental in the establishment of the Canadian IDAF.

International Oil Working Group

The IOWG worked towards the implementation of the oil embargo as initiated by the UN General Assembly. It grew out of the Sanctions Working Group, which was established in 1979. IOWD researched topics relating to the oil embargo, monitored tanker movements, gave testimonies at UN meetings, and distributed information. The organisation closed down in 1987.

Impact Visuals

Impact Visuals was a cooperative photo agency dedicated to social documentary photography. It started in 1964 and operated till 2001. Most of the archive comes from Afrapix, a now-dissolved South African collective of freelance photographers. Although most of the collection containing photographs, slides and negatives come from South Africa, it also covers other countries.

Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University holds a substantial collection of materials related to South Africa. Its South African subject collection contains documents, campaign materials, press clippings, photographs and other audio-visual materials covering several countries and international organisations involved in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Institute for Policy Studies

IPS was a Washington based progressive think-tank concerned with the promotion of democracy, justice, human rights and diversity. It became active on anti-apartheid in the 1980s.

Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch began in 1978 as Helsinki Watch (HW), a monitoring group of compliance by the former Soviet Union and communist bloc countries with the human rights provision of the 1975 Helsinki Final Act. It later extended its activities to other regions of the world, including Africa. It produces research reports on violations of human rights and pressurises governments and international organisations.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 3]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Frances E. Williams

Frances E. Williams was a notable African-American actress and activist in Los Angeles from the early 1940s until her death in 1995. As an activist, she was an outspoken advocate for social justice and equality, and her political activism spanned outside her local community to around the world. She was most notably involved in the South African anti-apartheid movement and communist solidarity activities, including the National Anti-Imperialist Movement in Solidarity with African Liberations (NAIMSAL), the Los Angeles Chapter, and Art against Apartheid.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 2]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 3]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 1]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Digital National Security Archive

The Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) is affiliated with the National Security Archive. DNSA holds a document collection of US government responses to historical events in South Africa. The primary source documents deal with most aspects of US policy towards apartheid South Africa, including sanctions, embargoes and nuclear collaboration.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 4]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Educators against Racism and Apartheid

Educators against Racism and Apartheid began in 1985 as Educators against Apartheid but it extended its activities to include racism in the USA and changed its name. Besides developing educational materials for schools and publishing a newsletter distributed to educators all over the country; it also organised a boycott of Kellogg’s cereals, appealing to young people. It was active in a campaign to withdraw US teachers’ retirement funds from companies dealing with South Africa.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 1]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Committee to End Apartheid

This was an anti-apartheid group based in Springfield, Massassachusetts. In December 1978, as a result of a picket, Max Kay Jewelers agreed to stop selling the South African Krugerrand. Frances Crowe was a founding member.

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 1]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

Cornell University Divestment Movement

A group at Cornell University, consisting of academics, staff and students, organised divestment campaigns at the university from 1976-1987. The group organised sit-ins and civil disobedience activities.

Council on African Affairs

The CAA started around 1943 and continued to operate until 1955. It worked on educating people on the history and struggle against colonialism and imperialism in Africa. It organised famine relief campaigns, legal defence funds and sit-ins and demonstrations. It organised public campaigns and fundraising for, amongst others, the ANC’s 1952 Defiance Campaign. The organisation was crippled by the emergence of the Cold War and the investigations of the House Un-American Activities Committee. It was repeatedly investigated.

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 2]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Clarity Films

Clarity Films is a not-for-profit organisation formed in 1979 to produce and distribute films of historical and social value. It produced several documentaries on South Africa and the solidarity movement. It holds over 250 hours of oral histories with137 interviewees, 800 hours of archival footage from many sources and a substantial photo and graphics collection.

Cleveland Robinson

Cleveland Robinson was an African American trade union leader and civil rights activist and was active in anti-apartheid campaigns. In addition to his union activity, Robinson was a stalwart of the civil rights movement. He was administrative chairman and one of the key organizers of the August 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A friend and advisor on labor matters to Martin Luther King, Jr, he was an active member of the National Urban League and the NAACP, a director of the Southern Christian leadership Council, and a trustee of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center in Atlanta, GA. He was also a leader in the struggle to mobilise American opposition to apartheid in South Africa and supported movements for labor and human rights in many African nations.

Champaign-Urbana Coalition against Apartheid

This was a campus based group at the University of Illinois. It operated from 1964 till about 1991 and worked especially for divestment by the university, boycott and human rights campaigns. The organisation continued and broadened its work in the early 1990s and changed its name to the Champaign-Urbana Coalition on Africa.

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 1]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Charlotteans for a Free Southern Africa

This local anti-apartheid organisation organised protests against loans by local business to the South African government. It also sponsored a number of events, and invited visits by speakers who would share insights and information with citizens of the community.

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 2]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Boston Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa

BCLSA was established after the 1976 Soweto uprising and started with a campaign against the ties between the First National Bank (FNB) of Boston and South Africa. It remained a specialist organisation but broadened its activities to disinvestment and boycott. It helped to form MassDivest in 1980, an organisation which led the campaign to disinvest the state pension from companies doing business with South Africa. It ceased to be a separate organisation in the mid 1980s and joined other organisations such as Free South Africa and TransAfrica.

Anti-Apartheid Support Group

AASG was based at the University of North Carolina and consisted mainly of students. It operated from about 1980-1987, but was not officially recognised as a student organisation until October 1985. Its main focus was to pressurise the University to disinvest from South Africa. The group dissolved when the university voted to divest in 1987.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Amnesty International USA

The AI-USA started in the early 1960s and has several offices in the country. It is an affiliate of AI- International Secretariat and bases its activities on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The campaigns concentrate on the rights of political prisoners and unfair trials, working towards the release of prisoners of conscience.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 1]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 4]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Aluka

Aluka, founded in 2003, is a digital library with materials about Africa. The Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa content area is dedicated, amongst others, to the international anti-apartheid struggle. It has a huge collection of materials from organisations all over the world.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 3]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 5]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 6]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 3]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Alexander Defence Committee

The ADC operated from 1965 until about 1971. It supported Dr Neville Alexander and other political prisoners and their families in South Africa, and was active in Canada, Europe and the USA. It organised speaker tours and raised funds, also for the families of political prisoners.

Africa News Service

ANS started in 1973 as a not-for-profit US news agency. For two decades it gathered news about Africa related issues and the US foreign policy towards Africa. It continues to operate as AllAfrica Global Media.

African Activists Archive Project

The African Activists Archive Project at Michigan State University works to preserve the history of US organisations and people in the struggle against apartheid. The very substantial website contains a directory of archives with descriptions. The project also has a substantial section on organisations outside the USA.

A. Philip Randolph

Mr A. Philip Randolph, an African American labour and civil rights activist, was a member of the Committee of Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), founded in 1952 to support the Defiance Campaign. He was also a member of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and headed the Committee on Conscience against Apartheid, formed by ACOA. He was very active in the End Loans campaigns.

Records of the Foreign Office: Export of Arms to South Africa: Internal Security Operations: Rivonia Sabotage Trial of ANC Leaders

These records fall under: Foreign Office: Political Departments: General Correspondence; Africa, West and Central (J): South Africa (JS) subseries.

Contains:
-The escape of Bob Hepple (telegram, 28 November 1963)
-Prison conditions with affidavits from Bernstein, Goldberg, Motsoaledi, Mbeki, Kathrada and Sisulu (report, 21 November 1963)
-Newspaper articles on the Rivonia trial (November and December 1963)
-Note from Mitford to the British Consulate General requesting that political trials that might seriously impact the Rivonia Trial to be closely monitored (5 December 1963)
-Visit by John Arnold Q.C. a leading conservative barrister in London (includes a summary of proceedings, 13 December 1963)
-Arrest, assault and torture of Isaac Tlale of the ANC at the hands of security police who wanted him to testify against the Rivonia accused. Police claimed to him that Joe Slovo bought Mandela and Sisulu with money from the communists (report/affidavit, no date)
-Report of John Arnold Q.C. at the International Commission of Jurists on his visit to South Africa and includes a comment that he believed the Rivonia trial judge was fair and partial (16 December 1963)
-Nelson Mandela's life sentence: reactions (1963)
-Foreign reaction to the Rivonia trial judgment and sentences
-Statement in parliament by H.F. Verwoerd (16 June 1964)
-Rivonia trial judgment (correspondence and press cuttings)
-Rivonia trial sentence (summary from press articles 1964)
-Question whether the British government should ask the South African government to reduce the life sentences handed down in the Rivonia trial (Correspondence, 26 June 1964)
-Libyan embassy in London will ask the UK secretary of state to intervene and have the Rivonia trial life sentences reduced (report, 15 June 1964)
-The U.S. state department will not ask for a reduction in the Rivonia trial (correspondence Internal British foreign office, (27 June 1964)
-Secretary of the state talking about the Rivonia (speech house of Commons, July 1964)
-The Canadian Ambassador asks that the Rivonia trial sentences be reduced (report, 22 July 1964)
-Rivonia trial accused decide not to appeal (report, 27 July 1964)
-The German government approaches South Africa about the Rivonia trial sentences (report, 2 September 1964)
-Book on Rivonia trial by Judge De Villiers (Report 24 September 1964)
-Death sentence in Rivonia trial "unlikely" (note, 4 June 1964)
-Upcoming judgement and sentence in the Rivonia trial (note , 2 June 1964)
-The Australian representative to South Africa has been instructed to register his government's concern over the Rivonia trial (note, 9 June 1964)
-U.K. should abstain in the vote on the Rivonia resolution by Ivory Coast and Morocco unless is amended (America will also abstain) (note, 10 June 1964)
-Verdicts in Rivonia Trial (telegram, 11 June 1964)
-Analysis of evidence at the Rivonia Trial (report, 10 June 1964)
-Decision to defer any attempt by the U.S. to get a reduction in Rivonia Trial sentences until the defence has lodged an appeal (note, 14 June 1964)
-Unsigned copy of the Rivonia trial judgement (15 June 1964)

UK Foreign Office

Reddy (ES) Papers

The papers consist of correspondence and printed material relating to South Africa and Namibia and document E. S. Reddy's work with anti-apartheid organizations around the world.
Subject file entitled "Rivonia Trial 1964" (Box 7, folder 342).

Reddy, Enuga S.

Pamphlet Collection

A collection of pamphlets from African, South American, Latin American, Asian, European, and North American countries which include material relating to politics, economics, social conditions, agriculture, legal topics, religious activities, history, government operations, education, and other areas. The collection is particularly strong in the area of African materials, with several nations represented. This collection is keyworded as containing Rivonia Trial material but the references are unclear.

Records of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA)

Documents the pioneering anti-apartheid group in the US from its establishment in the 1950s. Documents related to Rivonia Trial are:
-Campaign against South African Apartheid: Memos, draft letters to and lists of sponsors, resolutions and declarations, flyers, clippings and notes 1963 (1960-1964). Major topics: Appeal for action against Apartheid, Rivonia arrests and trials, international boycott of South African goods etc.
-African National Congress Pamphlets. Includes: South African on Trial: Behind the Rivonia Case (no date).
-Mandela, Nelson (ca. 1964). Major topic: Rivonia trial.
-World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners: Rivonia Trial: Newsletters, statements, press releases, brochure (1963-1964).
-Writings: Chief Albert Luthuli (1957 and 1964). Major topics: Racial situation, Rivonia trial, ANC.
-Writings: Nelson Mandela (1961 and 1964). Major topics: 1961 Stay-at-home demonstration, Rivonia trial.

Microfilm versions available at Manuscripts and Archives, University of Cape Town.

American Committee on Africa

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