Print preview Close

Showing 673 results

Archival description
United States
Print preview View:

Address by President Nelson Mandela on receiving the Congressional Gold Medal

  • ZA COM MR-S-634
  • Item
  • 1998-09-23
  • Part of Speeches

On receiving the Congressional Gold Medal ; U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS DELIVERS REMARKS AT PRESENTATION OF CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT, NELSON MANDELA
23 September 1998

SPEAKERS: U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS (D-CA)

[*] WATERS: President Clinton, President Man

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

''Peace Bench" at the UN Plaza unveiled in honour of Nelson Mandela

As a symbol of diplomacy and dialogue, the installation pays tribute to Nelson Mandela and his efforts to bring people together to find effective solutions for peace. The installation will remain at the Headquarters’ plaza through September 2018, when the plan is to transfer it to Oslo and a permanent location near the Nobel Peace Center and the Oslo City Hall.

A. Philip Randolph

Mr A. Philip Randolph, an African American labour and civil rights activist, was a member of the Committee of Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), founded in 1952 to support the Defiance Campaign. He was also a member of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and headed the Committee on Conscience against Apartheid, formed by ACOA. He was very active in the End Loans campaigns.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Amnesty International USA

The AI-USA started in the early 1960s and has several offices in the country. It is an affiliate of AI- International Secretariat and bases its activities on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The campaigns concentrate on the rights of political prisoners and unfair trials, working towards the release of prisoners of conscience.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Champaign-Urbana Coalition against Apartheid

This was a campus based group at the University of Illinois. It operated from 1964 till about 1991 and worked especially for divestment by the university, boycott and human rights campaigns. The organisation continued and broadened its work in the early 1990s and changed its name to the Champaign-Urbana Coalition on Africa.

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 3]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 1]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Impact Visuals

Impact Visuals was a cooperative photo agency dedicated to social documentary photography. It started in 1964 and operated till 2001. Most of the archive comes from Afrapix, a now-dissolved South African collective of freelance photographers. Although most of the collection containing photographs, slides and negatives come from South Africa, it also covers other countries.

International Council for Equality of Opportunity Principles

The ICEOP was founded in 1977 to promote social justice in South Africa. Reverend LH Sullivan devised a set of principles for companies conducting business in South Africa. This voluntary business code became known as the ‘Sullivan Principles’. The code required an annual independent evaluation of individual business activities in South Africa. The results were published in the public domain. The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and other anti-apartheid organisations disapproved of the ‘Sullivan Principles’ since it provided companies with a way out of the boycott.

International Defense and Aid Fund for Southern Africa- United States Committee

The US-IDAF was established in 1972. In addition to raising funds for legal defense of prisoners and aid for their dependents, it also disseminated information about conditions in Southern Africa and supported boycotts and other solidarity actions. It grew out of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). US-IDAF executive director Kenneth N. Carstens was also instrumental in the establishment of the Canadian IDAF.

Prexy Nesbitt : [Part 2]

Prexy Nesbitt is an activist and academic from Chicago who was active in the struggle to end apartheid and worked to end colonialism in Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia. He founded the Antioch Committee for a Free South Africa, which succeeded after a ten-year campaign to achieve the divestment of Antioch College’s holdings from companies involved with apartheid. Nesbitt worked for the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) where he coordinated the National Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa from 1976-1979. From 1979-1983 he was Program Director for the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches in Geneva. He has also worked for the Institute for Policy Studies, the American Friends Service Committee and Africa Action.

United Nations

The UN is an international organisation that aims to facilitate cooperation in international law, security, economic development, social progress, human rights and achieving world peace. It was founded in 1945 and replaced the League of Nations. It has been concerned with the issue of racial discrimination since its beginning and racism became an important item on the United Nations agenda after African nations attained independence and after the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa in 1960. The Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1963), which led to the International Convention in 1965. It proclaimed the International Year for Action to Combat Racial Discrimination in 1971 and the three Decades for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination in 1973. Besides the specialised agencies on apartheid, several other agencies of the UN were also involved in anti-apartheid and solidarity activities.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 2]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.
Results 1 to 100 of 673