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Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Address by President Nelson Mandela on receiving the Congressional Gold Medal

  • ZA COM MR-S-634
  • Item
  • 1998-09-23
  • Part of Speeches

On receiving the Congressional Gold Medal ; U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS DELIVERS REMARKS AT PRESENTATION OF CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT, NELSON MANDELA
23 September 1998

SPEAKERS: U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS (D-CA)

[*] WATERS: President Clinton, President Man

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

National Public Broadcasting Archives

Programmes and programme segments broadcast on National Public Radio. Includes reports on the following:
Disagreement in South Africa over apartheid crimes. Judges at South Africa’s new Constitutional Court being sworn in by Nelson Mandela. Winnie Mandela being fired from the cabinet of the South African government. Local government elections in South Africa. Nelson Mandela calling for sanctions against Nigeria, in the light of political executions. Openings of the South African parliament. The marital divorce of Nelson and Winnie Mandela. South Africa’s adoption of a new constitution and Nelson Mandela signing of the new constitution into law. Nelson Mandela’s involvement in the Zairian peace talks. FW De Klerk’s resignation from the National Party. Nelson Mandela stepping down as the president of the African National Congress (ANC). President Bill Clinton’s visit to South Africa, and his visit with Nelson Mandela to Robben Island. Reports that Mandela was the target of a poison plot. Nelson Mandela’s 80th birthday celebrations and his marriage to Graca Machel. The awarding of the Congressional Gold Medal to Nelson Mandela. Addresses by Nelson Mandela to the United Nations. The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Preparations for the 1999 South African general elections. Nelson Mandela’s final speech to the South African Parliament, before his retirement from politics. Political profiles of Nelson Mandela. The inauguration of Thabo Mbeki as the new President of South Africa.

National Public Radio

National Public Broadcasting Archives

Programmes and programme segments broadcast on National Public Radio. Includes reports on the following:
Appeals by Nelson Mandela to the United Nations Security Council, to assist Burundi. The 10th anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s release from prison. The international AIDS conference held in South Africa, and Nelson Mandela’s closing speech at the conference. Nelson Mandela’s role in the Burundi peace talks. The restoration of Nelson Mandela’s 1964 Rivonia Trial speech by the British Library. World Conference against Racism held in South Africa. Nelson Mandela’s response to George W. Bush’s ‘war on terrorism.’ The international AIDS conference held in Barcelona, with speeches by Bill Clinton and Nelson Mandela. World Summit on Sustainable Development, held in Johannesburg, South Africa. Peter Megabank talking about his work as Nelson Mandela’s official photographer. The death of South African anti-apartheid leader, Walter Sisulu, at the age of ninety. Bush’s visit to Africa. Birthday tributes to Nelson Mandela. Audio history of Nelson Mandela’s life. Nelson Mandela’s announcement to the media that his son, Makgatho, has died of AIDS.

National Public Radio

Africa Fund : [Part 3]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Digital National Security Archive

The Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) is affiliated with the National Security Archive. DNSA holds a document collection of US government responses to historical events in South Africa. The primary source documents deal with most aspects of US policy towards apartheid South Africa, including sanctions, embargoes and nuclear collaboration.

Institute for Policy Studies

IPS was a Washington based progressive think-tank concerned with the promotion of democracy, justice, human rights and diversity. It became active on anti-apartheid in the 1980s.

Mandela Manuscripts

Presented to Lloyd Cutler by South Africa’s Chief Justice Arthur Chaskalson in 1997. Lloyd Cutler was founding partner of the WilmerHale Law Firm and a civil rights activist in the US. They were to recognise the firm's role in the fight to end Apartheid.

Papers include transcripts of his speech at the 1963-64 Rivonia Trial, notes that Mandela made in his own handwriting both during his trial and as he sat in prison on the night before he heard the sentence on his life. These are copies of originals donated by President Mandela to Bram Fischer Library (now held at Historical Papers, University of Witwatersrand).

Untitled

National Security Archive Declassified Document Set

Memoranda, reports, statements, cables and project statements covering the following:
United States Embassy (South Africa) reports that the African National Congress (ANC) was created to carry out sabotage, stating that the arrest of Nelson Mandela occurred after he planned subversive activities (1962). A memorandum issued by the Summit Conference of Independent African States held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (1963), agreeing to provide funding to help South African liberation movements and calling for the release from prison of Nelson Mandela, Robert Sobukwe and all other political prisoners. A memorandum on the Rivonia Trial providing biographical information on the Rivonia Trialists, and in which Nelson Mandela argues that opposition groups resorted to armed struggle only after avenues for peaceful change were blocked (1964). A report in which ANC and Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) leaders, including Nelson Mandela, Michael Harmel and Walter Sisulu are described as Communists, and documents presented during the Rivonia Trial are cited as evidence of the contacts between the ANC, PAC, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and the Communist Party of the People's Republic of China (1964). A memorandum of conversation in which Cecil Eprile characterises black leaders like Nelson Mandela as careless and prone to bad judgment (1965). A cable relating to Resolution 473 of the United Nations Security Council urging South Africa to release all political prisoners, including Nelson Mandela (1980). Biographic sketch information on Nelson Mandela provided by the US Department of State (1983). A cable on the awarding of the international Simon Bolivar prize to Nelson Mandela by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) (1983). Correspondence to the South African Ambassador to the United States, calling for the release of Nelson Mandela (1984). A cable about the Johannesburg Star Newspaper reports that the arrest of Nelson Mandela 25 years ago occurred after he was betrayed by a US Central Intelligence Agency agent posing as a diplomat of the United States Consulate General in Durban (1986). A statement in which Chester A. Crocker calls for the release of Nelson Mandela (1986). A report in which the US Department of State Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on South Africa asserts that the first steps taken by South Africa must be the release of Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki and all other political prisoners (1987).

US State Department

American Committee on Africa : [Part 1]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 4]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 1]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

TransAfrica

Transafrica was founded in 1977 as the African American Lobby on Africa and the Caribbean. It worked closely with the Congressional Black Caucus and was active in divestments, boycott and other campaigns. It organised and participated in sit-ins in the office of the South African ambassador in Washington, followed by demonstrations outside South African embassies and consulates, organised by what became the Free South Africa Movement (FSAM).

South Africa: The Making of US Policy: 1962-1989

This collection provides primary source documents describing U.S. relationships to apartheid including implementation, enforcement, and violations of the U.N-sponsored sanctions against South Africa. Including the following that relate to the Rivonia Trial:
-United States Embassy (South Africa) reports that the African National Congress (ANC) was created to carry out sabotage, stating that the arrest of Nelson Mandela occurred after he planned subversive activities (1962).
-A memorandum issued by the Summit Conference of Independent African States held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (1963), agreeing to provide funding to help South African liberation movements and calling for the release from prison of Nelson Mandela, Robert Sobukwe and all other political prisoners.
-A memorandum on the Rivonia Trial providing biographical information on the Rivonia Trialists, and in which Nelson Mandela argues that opposition groups resorted to armed struggle only after avenues for peaceful change were blocked (1964).
-A report in which ANC and Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) leaders, including Nelson Mandela, Michael Harmel and Walter Sisulu are described as Communists, and documents presented during the Rivonia Trial are cited as evidence of the contacts between the ANC, PAC, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and the Communist Party of the People's Republic of China (1964).
-A memorandum of conversation in which Cecil Eprile characterises black leaders like Nelson Mandela as careless and prone to bad judgment (1965).
-A cable relating to Resolution 473 of the United Nations Security Council urging South Africa to release all political prisoners, including Nelson Mandela (1980).
-Biographic sketch information on Nelson Mandela provided by the US Department of State (1983).
-A cable on the awarding of the international Simon Bolivar prize to Nelson Mandela by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) (1983).
-Correspondence to the South African Ambassador to the United States, calling for the release of Nelson Mandela (1984).
- A cable about the Johannesburg Star Newspaper reports that the arrest of Nelson Mandela 25 years ago occurred after he was betrayed by a US Central Intelligence Agency agent posing as a diplomat of the United States Consulate General in Durban (1986).
- A statement in which Chester A. Crocker calls for the release of Nelson Mandela (1986).
- A report in which the US Department of State Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on South Africa asserts that the first steps taken by South Africa must be the release of Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki and all other political prisoners (1987).

The National Security Archive is a non-profit research institute and library providing public access to declassified government documents obtained through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). These are then published as declassified document sets (as this one on South Africa), are produced in microfiche, and digitised to become part of the Digital National Security Archive database which some universities subscribe to (Monash University in South Africa).

US State Department

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) CREST

Congressional record house CREST General CIA records on Nelson Mandela : What if alive in free Some Sections Omitted
South Africa politics of racial reform.
South Africa: Dynamics of black politics
African National Congress of South Africa Organisation, Communist, Ties and short term prospects
Prospects for South Africa; Stability reform and violence
South Africa profile of an angry black ( Sections Omitted)
Prospects for South Africa stability reform and violence
Africa review
Terrorism review
Africa review
South Africa: The Boipatong massacre and the reigning of the security forces
South Africa weathering the storm
National daily intelligence
South Africa: Inkatha scandal may accelerate police restructuring
South Africa's brokers ballots and bullets
South Africa chronology
Africa review: special issue: South Africa entering the 1990's

Central Intelligence Agency

American Committee on Africa : [Part 3]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 5]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 6]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 2]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights under Law (Southern Africa Project) : [Part 2]

The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law was created at the request of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. It provided legal representation in political and quasi-political trials in South Africa. It sent out alerts to organisations in the US and to State Department officials concerning human rights violations.

Speech by President Mandela at a reception hosted by President Clinton

  • ZA COM MR-S-633
  • Item
  • 1998-09-22
  • Part of Speeches

Reception hosted by President Clinton ; The speech on page 1 of the Transcript Section is the one issued by the Office of the President which is both on the ANC website and the South African Government Information Website. It is assumed that the speech on page 2 is the one actually given as it

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

National Public Broadcasting Archives

Programmes and programme segments broadcast on National Public Radio. Includes reports on:
Speculation on the possible release of Nelson Mandela from prison. Nelson Mandela’s views on the South African apartheid government. PW Botha’s offer to Nelson Mandela of conditional release, and Nelson Mandela’s rejection of the offer, communicated to the outside world by his daughter, Zindzi, at a mass gathering in Soweto. The firebombing of the Nelson Mandela home in Soweto. Meeting between Steven Solarz and PW Botha. The arrest of United Democratic Front (UDF) leader, Allan Boesak, ahead of a planned march to Pollsmoor Prison calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. Reports on the Pollsmoor March. Profiles of Nelson Mandela and the Mandela family. Profiles of the African National Congress (ANC), in which Mandela is mentioned. Scrapping of the pass laws in South Africa. Release Mandela Campaign, in which Aubrey Mokena, one of the campaign’s key organizers, is mentioned. Nelson Mandela’s calls for South African government negotiations with the ANC. UK Foreign Minister, Geoffrey Howe’s visit to South Africa and meeting with PW Botha. Zenani Mandela’s visit to the United States for a birthday commemoration in honour of Martin Luther King Jr. Twenty- fifth anniversary of Mandela’s imprisonment. Reports of a 1960 speech by Nelson Mandela on the reasons for the armed struggle. Free Mandela concert held at Wembley Stadium, London, in commemoration of his 70th birthday, and other commemorative events. Nelson Mandela’s hospitalisation because of tuberculosis. Reports on meetings between Nelson Mandela and PW Botha, and of his ‘secret’ negotiations with the South African government.
Freeing of Walter Sisulu, Ahmed Kathrada and other long-serving political prisoners. Reports on the imminent closure of Kapitan, one of Nelson Mandela’s favourite restaurants since the 1950s. Legalisation of the ANC, and announcement of other reforms by FW De Klerk.

National Public Radio

National Public Broadcasting Archives

Programmes and programme segments broadcast on National Public Radio. Includes reports on the following:
Nelson Mandela’s release from prison, and his first public speech to a mass gathering on the Grand Parade in Cape Town. Comments by Nelson Mandela and Harold Wolpe on the importance of continued economic sanctions against South Africa. Comments by Randall Robinson of Transafrica who believes that Nelson Mandela’s release should not be seen as the ultimate solution to all of South Africa’s problems. The reaction of the African National Congress (ANC) to Nelson Mandela’s release, and reports on the future of South Africa in light of Nelson Mandela’s release from prison. Report on race relations in South Africa since 1962, in which Nelson Mandela is mentioned. Nelson Mandela’s role in political negotiations and in shaping the new South African government, including reports on various meetings with FW De Klerk. Nelson Mandela’s role in seeking a solution to political violence in South Africa, particularly in the KwaZulu-Natal region. Profiles of Nelson Mandela, including reports about his birthplace in the Transkei. The London rock concert held in honour of Nelson Mandela after his release from prison. Report that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was instrumental in the arrest of Nelson Mandela in 1962.
Nelson Mandela’s tour of the United States after his release from prison. Speeches delivered at the United Nations. Nelson Mandela’s meetings with Palestinian Liberation Organisation (PLO) leader, Yasser Arafat, and Libyan leader, Muammar Gadhafi. ANC’s use of armed struggle as a bargaining chip in negotiations. Meetings between President Bush and Nelson Mandela, and Nelson Mandela addresses the US Congress. Nelson Mandela’s views on the Irish Republican Army (IRA). Meetings between President Margaret Thatcher and Nelson Mandela. Political violence in South African townships during the South African transition process. The suspension of armed struggle by the ANC. The first ANC conference held inside South Africa’s borders in thirty years. Nelson Mandela’s election as president of the ANC. The marital separation of Nelson and Winnie Mandela. Re-writing of South Africa’s constitution. The ANC’s suspension of talks with the South African government because of the Boipatong massacre. Comments by Nelson Mandela on the Bisho Massacre. The resumption of talks between the ANC and the South African government on South Africa’s political future. Reaction to the news of Chris Hani’s assassination. The awarding of the Liberty Medal to Nelson Mandela and De Klerk by President Bill Clinton. Nelson Mandela calling for the lifting of sanctions. The awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to Nelson Mandela and FW De Klerk. The ANC’s campaign for South Africa’s first democratic elections. Reports of voting in the historic 1994 elections. A chronology of South African history with Mandela mentioned. The election victory of the ANC and Nelson Mandela’s victory speech. Inauguration ceremony in which Nelson Mandela was sworn in as the first democratically elected President of South Africa. Nelson Mandela’s first State of the Nation address, and his first 100 days as President Nelson Mandela’s visit to the US as President of South Africa, encouraging investment. Reports on Nelson Mandela's biography, ‘Long Walk to Freedom.' The death of Joe Slovo and memorial tributes by Nelson Mandela.

National Public Radio

WEMFA 2001 Award for Leadership and Development from the World Environmental Movement for Africa award in conjunction with the World Institute for Leadership Development

Award naming Mr Mandela as the 2001 recipient of the WEMFA Award for Leadership and Development in conjunction with the World Institute for Leadership Development (WILDEV)

World Environmental Movement for Africa and World Institute for Leadership Development