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Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives
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Karel Roskam : [Part 1]

Karel Roskam was a radio journalist with the progressive broadcaster Vara. He was also a member of Omroep voor Radio Freedom. He produced numerous radio programmes and interviewed many people during the period 1961-1992.

Thomas Oliver 'Tom' Newnham

Tom Newnham was a New Zealand political activist. He was involved in several causes, including attacking institutional racism in New Zealand, and opposing the 1981 Springbok Tour and apartheid in general. He was national president and secretary of the Citizens Association for Racial Equality (CARE) at various times.

Karel Roskam : [Part 2]

Karel Roskam was a radio journalist with the progressive broadcaster Vara. He was also a member of Omroep voor Radio Freedom. He produced numerous radio programmes and interviewed many people during the period 1961-1992.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 3]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 4]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 1]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

The Nordic Documentation on the Liberation Struggle in Southern Africa Project

This site provides archival lists of primary source materials that can be found at Nordic archival institutions, NGOs and archives of individuals who have been involved in the liberation struggles of Southern Africa. The website includes interviews, photographs, publications, posters and newspaper cuttings from 1960-1996. It also provides some archival materials in PDF format.

International Confederation of Free Trade Unions

The ICFTU was an international trade union founded in London in 1949 by unions opposing growing communist control of the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU). Its activities on South Africa were organised through the Coordination Committee on Southern Africa and the International Solidarity Fund Committee. ICFTU was dissolved in 2006 when it merged with the World Confederation of Labour (WCL) to form the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).

John de Courcy Ireland

John de Courcy Ireland was, amongst others, Secretary of the Central Branch of the Labour Party, and was involved in numerous progressive organisations. He had a distinguished and lifelong commitment to Irish and international maritime history and affairs, to radical politics and to humanism. He and his wife, Betty, were affiliated with The Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement. He was also a founding member of the Irish Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 1]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 2]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 3]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Organisation of African Unity

The OAU was founded in 1963 to work towards unity and solidarity amongst African countries and act as a collective voice for the African continent. It worked towards the eradication of all forms of colonialism. The OAU's Coordinating Committee for the Liberation of Africa (Liberation Committee) organised diplomatic support and channeled financial, military and logistical aid to liberation movements. The OAU was disbanded in 2002 and replaced by the African Union (AU).

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 2]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 3]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 1]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 1]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Impact Visuals

Impact Visuals was a cooperative photo agency dedicated to social documentary photography. It started in 1964 and operated till 2001. Most of the archive comes from Afrapix, a now-dissolved South African collective of freelance photographers. Although most of the collection containing photographs, slides and negatives come from South Africa, it also covers other countries.

Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility : [Part 1]

The Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR) was established in 1975 as a coalition of Canadian Churches. It worked towards social responsibility in Canadian based corporations and financial institutions. It supported the South African Council of Churches (SACC) proposal for a code of business ethics for companies operating in South Africa. It campaigned strongly to end loans to the apartheid regime and approached shareholders to accomplish this. In 2001, TCCR became part of KAIROS Canada.

Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility : [Part 2]

The Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR) was established in 1975 as a coalition of Canadian Churches. It worked towards social responsibility in Canadian based corporations and financial institutions. It supported the South African Council of Churches (SACC) proposal for a code of business ethics for companies operating in South Africa. It campaigned strongly to end loans to the apartheid regime and approached shareholders to accomplish this. In 2001, TCCR became part of KAIROS Canada.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 3]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Africa Fund : [Part 3]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 1]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 4]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 3]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 5]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 6]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 2]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Inter-Church Coalition on Africa

The main focus of the Inter-Church Coalition on Africa (ICCAF) was on human rights and social justice. It coordinated the activities of the Canadian churches against apartheid. The ICCAF has been involved in anti-apartheid activities since the 1980s. In 2001 it merged with a number of other organisations to form KAIROS Canada.

Brazilian Committee of Solidarity with the Peoples of South Africa and Namibia [Comit

The Brazilian Committee of Solidarity with the Peoples of South Africa and Namibia (ComAfrica) started in 1985 as a bridge from academic research to action by civil society. It had strong links with the labour movement and the Black Movement (Movimento Negro) in Brazil. It organised information campaigns and support for the recognition of the liberation movements ANC and SWAPO. It organised political tours of Brazil for members of the liberation movements and co-founded the Nelson Mandela Reception Committee in 1990. In 2000 the organisation changed its name to Instituto ComAfrica.

Carla Weitzel

Carla Weitzel was a student at the University of Missouri, Columbia and one of the leaders in the divestment campaign at the university which began in 1978. The group organised rallies, wrote articles, etc.

Liberation : [Part 1]

Liberation started in 1954 as the Movement for Colonial Freedom (MCF) and changed its name in 1970 to Liberation. Its mission was to work towards the political freeing of colonial peoples and political independence. It worked with trade unions and the labour party, supported the AAM, War on Want and other organisations. It did a lot of educational work, organised public meetings and conferences, and lobbied government. It dissolved in 1997.

Southern Africa Liberation Committee

The SALC was a community organisation based at Michigan State University (MSU). It operated from 1973-1997, and was active at MSU and in the greater East Lansing area. It organised a number of successful educational and social action campaigns, and was very active in lobbying for divestment, consumer boycotts and no-loans to South Africa.

We and Them Foundation [Stichting Wij en Zij]

The We and Them Foundation was founded in 1982 by the International Development Cooperation of the Federation of Dutch Trade Unions (FNV). Besides direct support to trade unions in South Africa, the foundation also participated in campaigns of the national AAMs. It changed its name to FNV Mondiaal in 1997.

Liberation : [Part 2]

Liberation started in 1954 as the Movement for Colonial Freedom (MCF) and changed its name in 1970 to Liberation. Its mission was to work towards the political freeing of colonial peoples and political independence. It worked with trade unions and the labour party, supported the AAM, War on Want and other organisations. It did a lot of educational work, organised public meetings and conferences, and lobbied government. It dissolved in 1997.

Lawyers Against Apartheid

Lawyers Against Apartheid was formed in 1986 to lobby the legal community in the UK. It was affiliated to the AAM. As a specialist organisation, it concentrated on the exposure of the illegitimacy of the apartheid regime and promoting the Prisoner of War status for captured freedom fighters. It dissolved in 1996.

Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust

The South Africa Racial Amity Trust (SARAT), launched in 1966, was the predecessor of The Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust (BART). SARAT aimed to promote knowledge about apartheid through research and publications. It paid special attention to the plight of children under apartheid. It was renamed BART in 1980 in honour of its treasurer. It was dissolved in 1996.

Holland Committee on Southern Africa [Komitee Zuiderlijk Afrika] : [Part 1]

The KZA existed from 1976 till 1996. It continued the work of the Angola Committee which started in 1961 in support of the liberation movements in the Portuguese colonies. It fundraised for material support to the liberation movements. One of its big campaigns was the oil boycott, mainly directed against (Royal Dutch) Shell. It bought shares in order to be able to attend shareholders meetings where it could pressure Shell to withdraw from South Africa. It initiated the formation of the Shipping Research Bureau, together with Kairos, and was part of the Liaison Group. The KZA merged with the AABN and the EMF in 1997 to form NIZA.

Holland Committee on Southern Africa [Komitee Zuiderlijk Afrika] : [Part 2]

The KZA existed from 1976 till 1996. It continued the work of the Angola Committee which started in 1961 in support of the liberation movements in the Portuguese colonies. It fundraised for material support to the liberation movements. One of its big campaigns was the oil boycott, mainly directed against (Royal Dutch) Shell. It bought shares in order to be able to attend shareholders meetings where it could pressure Shell to withdraw from South Africa. It initiated the formation of the Shipping Research Bureau, together with Kairos, and was part of the Liaison Group. The KZA merged with the AABN and the EMF in 1997 to form NIZA.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 3]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Campaign Against Racial Exploitation : [Part 2]

The Campaign Against Racial Exploitation (CARE) was a national anti-racist umbrella organisation whose activities focused on anti-apartheid and Australian Aboriginal issues. It was formed in 1973 as the first national anti-apartheid and anti-racism network in Australia, at the suggestion of South African exile Neville Curtis, and formally launched in December 1974. CARE launched many campaigns, including those against South African company Rothmans, as well as Woolworths and Shell, and was prominent in sports boycotts.

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Isolate South Africa Committee [Isolera Sydafkrika-Kommittén]

ISAC was an umbrella organisation consisting of a variety of organisations in one way or another engaged in the support for the struggle against apartheid and colonialism in southern Africa. ISAC started in 1979 when it organised its first annual campaign to isolate South Africa and to support the liberation movements and political prisoners. It became an influential lobby group and often worked together with other Nordic countries. Its campaign work expanded from the annual campaign to year-long activities. It ceased to function in 1995.

Shipping Research Bureau : [Part 2]

The Shipping Research Bureau was a specialist organisation, mainly dealing with research into the oil trade with South Africa and alerting the world to breaches of the UN oil embargo. It pressured national governments to adopt sanctions against South Africa. It was founded by the Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika (KZA) and Working Group Kairos in 1980, and continued operating until 1995.

Broadcasters for Radio Freedom [Omroep voor Radio Freedom]

The OvRF started in 1982 on the initiative of the AABN and mobilised people in the broadcasting sector to support Radio Freedom, the radio station of the ANC. Their aim being to raise financial support to train and equip several broadcasting stations for Radio Freedom. The organisation operated until 1995.

Campaign Against Racial Exploitation : [Part 1]

The Campaign Against Racial Exploitation (CARE) was a national anti-racist umbrella organisation whose activities focused on anti-apartheid and Australian Aboriginal issues. It was formed in 1973 as the first national anti-apartheid and anti-racism network in Australia, at the suggestion of South African exile Neville Curtis, and formally launched in December 1974. CARE launched many campaigns, including those against South African company Rothmans, as well as Woolworths and Shell, and was prominent in sports boycotts.

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 1]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Miners' International Federation

The Miners' International Federation was founded in Jolimont, Belgium in 1890. The MIF was affiliated with the International Labour Organisation, which organised numerous conferences on South Africa and apartheid and was active on boycott issues related to workers’ rights. In 1995 the MIF merged with the International Federation of Chemical, Energy and General Workers' Unions (ICEM).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 4]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Frances E. Williams

Frances E. Williams was a notable African-American actress and activist in Los Angeles from the early 1940s until her death in 1995. As an activist, she was an outspoken advocate for social justice and equality, and her political activism spanned outside her local community to around the world. She was most notably involved in the South African anti-apartheid movement and communist solidarity activities, including the National Anti-Imperialist Movement in Solidarity with African Liberations (NAIMSAL), the Los Angeles Chapter, and Art against Apartheid.

Broadcasters for Radio Freedom [Omroep voor Radio Freedom]

The OvRF started in 1982 on the initiative of the AABN and mobilised people in the broadcasting sector to support Radio Freedom, the radio station of the ANC. Their aim being to raise financial support to train and equip several broadcasting stations for Radio Freedom. The organisation operated until 1995.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 2]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Cleveland Robinson

Cleveland Robinson was an African American trade union leader and civil rights activist and was active in anti-apartheid campaigns. In addition to his union activity, Robinson was a stalwart of the civil rights movement. He was administrative chairman and one of the key organizers of the August 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A friend and advisor on labor matters to Martin Luther King, Jr, he was an active member of the National Urban League and the NAACP, a director of the Southern Christian leadership Council, and a trustee of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center in Atlanta, GA. He was also a leader in the struggle to mobilise American opposition to apartheid in South Africa and supported movements for labor and human rights in many African nations.

Health and Refugee Trust of South Africa

The Health and Refugee Trust of South Africa was established in 1988. The prime objective of HEART was the provision of health and welfare to the tens of thousands of South African refugees during the apartheid regime. They sought to actively promote health education, immunisation, nutrition, and provision of essential drugs, water and sanitation and treatment of common diseases.

Shipping Research Bureau : [Part 1]

The Shipping Research Bureau was a specialist organisation, mainly dealing with research into the oil trade with South Africa and alerting the world to breaches of the UN oil embargo. It pressured national governments to adopt sanctions against South Africa. It was founded by the Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika (KZA) and Working Group Kairos in 1980, and continued operating until 1995.

Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany (AAB) operated from 1974 till 1994. It was formed on the initiative of the Mainz Working Group on Southern Africa (MAKSA). It was very active in the campaigns against the arms trade with South Africa, the release of Nelson Mandela, as well as the fruit, sport, Royal Dutch Shell and cultural boycott. It consisted of a network of local groups and worked with a variety of peace and religious organisations. In the late 1970s/early 1980s it used shareholders meetings (by buying shares) to pressurise banks not to deal with South Africa and pressured the Federal government to take an active anti-apartheid position. The AAB also participated in the Liaison Group. In May 1994 the AAB changed its name to Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis, which continued to carry out solidarity work with Southern Africa. Since the end of August 2001, Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis was dissolved and Koordination Südliches Afrika (KOSA, Co-ordination for Southern Africa) became the successor organisation.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 2]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement [Arbeiderbevegelsens Internasjonale Støttekomité]

The International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement was a solidarity committee organised under the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions, supporting and working with international solidarity and union issues. The Norwegian Trade Union movement was one of the key movements in Norway supporting the liberation struggle in Southern Africa. AIS worked closely with the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU)

Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The Irish AAM was established in 1964 and functioned till 1994. It was co-founded by Kader Asmal (who later became a South African MP and cabinet member) and started with sport, cultural, economic and academic boycotts and grew into an organisation that was active in all areas of anti-apartheid and solidarity. It gave direct support to the liberation movements and worked closely with the ANC. It continues to be active as the Ireland South Africa Association.

Norwegian Council for Southern Africa [Fellesrådet for det sørlige Afrika] : [Part 1]

NOCOZA was formed in 1967 by a merger of NAMA and CFSA. It was an umbrella organisation for youth organisations and undertook solidarity work for southern Africa and anti-apartheid activities. It opened for individual membership and other organisations in 1976 and started local committees. It also worked with the Shipping Research Bureau on the oil boycott of South Africa. It continued to operate after 1994 as Norwegian Council for Africa.

United Nations Special Committee against Apartheid

The Special Committee against Apartheid was set up in 1962 and operated till 1994. Initially named the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, the name was shortened in 1971 to Special Committee on Apartheid and changed again in 1974 to Special Committee against Apartheid. One of its main roles was to secure effective, mandatory sanctions against South Africa. It worked closely together with the OAU, the liberation movements and the AAMs.

Birmingham Anti-Apartheid Movement

Birmingham Anti-Apartheid Movement was formed around 1966 and was very active in the consumer boycott. It started twinning projects with the ANC in the Western Transvaal and organised an annual ‘Soweto Walk’ to raise funds.

City of London Anti-Apartheid Group (City Group) : [Part 1]

The City of London Anti-Apartheid Group was a breakaway group of the national AAM, founded in 1982 by Norma Kitson, and allied to the Revolutionary Communist Group. City Group developed a close working relationship not only with the ANC and SWAPO, but also with the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), AZAPO, and Black Consciousness supporters. In 1985 City Group was expelled from the national AAM, and from 1986 - 1990 its supporters maintained a Non-Stop Picket outside the South African Embassy in Trafalgar Square calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. The City Group archives provide an opportunity to understand a different perspective on the international anti-apartheid movement.

National Gathering against Apartheid [Rencontre National contre l’Apartheid] : [Part 1]

RNCA was a national organisation which started in the 1970s as L’Association Française d’Amitié avec les Peuples d’Afrique (AFASPA). AFASPA was created by trade unionists and anti-colonialists and most of it activities were focused on the French colonies. In 1986 RNCA was formed by AFASPA to focus solely on anti-apartheid activities. In the beginning it mainly worked towards the implementation of sanctions, but it later became a strong supporter of the ANC office in Paris. RNCA continues to operate as Rencontre National avec le People d’Afrique du Sud (RENAPAS).

Norwegian Council for Southern Africa [Fellesrådet for det sørlige Afrika] : [Part 2]

NOCOZA was formed in 1967 by a merger of NAMA and CFSA. It was an umbrella organisation for youth organisations and undertook solidarity work for southern Africa and anti-apartheid activities. It opened for individual membership and other organisations in 1976 and started local committees. It also worked with the Shipping Research Bureau on the oil boycott of South Africa. It continued to operate after 1994 as Norwegian Council for Africa.

Seafarer's Union

In December 1989, the Federated Cooks and Stewards of NZ, the NZ Seamen's Union and the North Shore Ferry Employees merged to form the NZ Seafarers' Union. The Maritime Union of New Zealand was formed in 2002 when the New Zealand Waterfront Workers’ Union and the New Zealand Seafarers’ Union joined together.

Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The Welsh Committee of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) was established in 1981 and adopted the name The Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement (WAAM). WAAM operated as a national movement in Wales, with a clear Welsh identity. It was dissolved in 1994 following the first democratic elections in South Africa and its assets were transferred to Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) Wales, which continues to campaign and work for peace and democracy in Southern Africa.

Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The Welsh Committee of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) was established in 1981 and adopted the name The Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement (WAAM). WAAM operated as a national movement in Wales, with a clear Welsh identity. It was dissolved in 1994 following the first democratic elections in South Africa and its assets were transferred to Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) Wales, which continues to campaign and work for peace and democracy in Southern Africa.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 1]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 3]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Educators against Racism and Apartheid

Educators against Racism and Apartheid began in 1985 as Educators against Apartheid but it extended its activities to include racism in the USA and changed its name. Besides developing educational materials for schools and publishing a newsletter distributed to educators all over the country; it also organised a boycott of Kellogg’s cereals, appealing to young people. It was active in a campaign to withdraw US teachers’ retirement funds from companies dealing with South Africa.

Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The Irish AAM was established in 1964 and functioned till 1994. It was co-founded by Kader Asmal (who later became a South African MP and cabinet member) and started with sport, cultural, economic and academic boycotts and grew into an organisation that was active in all areas of anti-apartheid and solidarity. It gave direct support to the liberation movements and worked closely with the ANC. It continues to be active as the Ireland South Africa Association.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 1]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 1]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

Uppsala Africa Group

The UAG grew out of the Uppsala South Africa Committee (USAK) which was started in 1963 by the Uppsala Student Union. It reorganised itself in 1968 and became UAG which operated till 1994. It developed into a general membership organisations which also supported the armed struggle.

City of London Anti-Apartheid Group (City Group) : [Part 2]

The City of London Anti-Apartheid Group was a breakaway group of the national AAM, founded in 1982 by Norma Kitson, and allied to the Revolutionary Communist Group. City Group developed a close working relationship not only with the ANC and SWAPO, but also with the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), AZAPO, and Black Consciousness supporters. In 1985 City Group was expelled from the national AAM, and from 1986 - 1990 its supporters maintained a Non-Stop Picket outside the South African Embassy in Trafalgar Square calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. The City Group archives provide an opportunity to understand a different perspective on the international anti-apartheid movement.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 1]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 2]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung] : [Part 1]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany (AAB) operated from 1974 till 1994. It was formed on the initiative of the Mainz Working Group on Southern Africa (MAKSA). It was very active in the campaigns against the arms trade with South Africa, the release of Nelson Mandela, as well as the fruit, sport, Royal Dutch Shell and cultural boycott. It consisted of a network of local groups and worked with a variety of peace and religious organisations. In the late 1970s/early 1980s it used shareholders meetings (by buying shares) to pressurise banks not to deal with South Africa and pressured the Federal government to take an active anti-apartheid position. The AAB also participated in the Liaison Group. In May 1994 the AAB changed its name to Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis, which continued to carry out solidarity work with Southern Africa. Since the end of August 2001, Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis was dissolved and Koordination Südliches Afrika (KOSA, Co-ordination for Southern Africa) became the successor organisation.

Anti-Apartheid Movement Netherlands [Anti-Apartheids Beweging Nederland] : [Part 2]

The AABN operated from 1961 till 1994 and was one of the major organisations in the Netherlands. It continued the work of the Comité Zuid-Afrika (CZA) and its solidarity with the liberation movements was unconditional. Besides campaigns focusing on boycott activities and political prisoners, it also organised grass roots based activities with practical solidarity through its committees dealing with education, women, culture, etc. It was instrumental in the formation of several specialist organisations. It was part of the Liaison Group. The AABN stopped operating in 1994 and continued as the Institute on Southern Africa (IZA) and merged with the KZA and the EMS in 1997 to form the Netherlands Institute on Southern Africa (NIZA). Since September 2007 NIZA has been associated with ActionAid International and is now operating as ActionAid.

End Loans to Southern Africa

The End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA) started in 1974 with campaigns against British banks with South Africa ties. Its aim was to end apartheid through the imposition of effective financial sanctions. It broadened its work to include consumer and shareholder action and parliamentary lobbying. It did a lot of research to support its campaigns. It transformed itself into the Southern Africa Economic Research Unit (SAERU) in 1994.

Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 3]

The Irish AAM was established in 1964 and functioned till 1994. It was co-founded by Kader Asmal (who later became a South African MP and cabinet member) and started with sport, cultural, economic and academic boycotts and grew into an organisation that was active in all areas of anti-apartheid and solidarity. It gave direct support to the liberation movements and worked closely with the ANC. It continues to be active as the Ireland South Africa Association.

National Gathering against Apartheid [Rencontre National contre l’Apartheid] : [Part 2]

RNCA was a national organisation which started in the 1970s as L’Association Française d’Amitié avec les Peuples d’Afrique (AFASPA). AFASPA was created by trade unionists and anti-colonialists and most of it activities were focused on the French colonies. In 1986 RNCA was formed by AFASPA to focus solely on anti-apartheid activities. In the beginning it mainly worked towards the implementation of sanctions, but it later became a strong supporter of the ANC office in Paris. RNCA continues to operate as Rencontre National avec le People d’Afrique du Sud (RENAPAS).

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 3]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 2]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

South Africa/Namibia Association

The SA/NAM was founded in 1986 and worked until 1993 to co-ordinate development projects in South Africa and Namibia. In South Africa, most of the funds went to the Kagiso Trust. The funds mainly came from SA/NAM members, European NGOs and anti-apartheid organisations, as well as from the European Special Programme for Victims of Apartheid (ESP).

Women against Apartheid - Frankfurt [Frauen gegen Apartheid - Frankfurt] : [Part 1]

This was a local organisation of women in Frankfurt which formed part of the national Women against Apartheid organisation. Its activities included a boycott campaign against the Krugerrand gold coin and campaigns against banks making loans to South Africa. It also participated in the Outspan fruit boycott, and worked in schools.
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