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345 Archival description results for United States

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Dennis Brutus : [Part 1]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

A. Philip Randolph

Mr A. Philip Randolph, an African American labour and civil rights activist, was a member of the Committee of Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), founded in 1952 to support the Defiance Campaign. He was also a member of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and headed the Committee on Conscience against Apartheid, formed by ACOA. He was very active in the End Loans campaigns.

Cleveland Robinson

Cleveland Robinson was an African American trade union leader and civil rights activist and was active in anti-apartheid campaigns. In addition to his union activity, Robinson was a stalwart of the civil rights movement. He was administrative chairman and one of the key organizers of the August 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A friend and advisor on labor matters to Martin Luther King, Jr, he was an active member of the National Urban League and the NAACP, a director of the Southern Christian leadership Council, and a trustee of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center in Atlanta, GA. He was also a leader in the struggle to mobilise American opposition to apartheid in South Africa and supported movements for labor and human rights in many African nations.

Council on African Affairs

The CAA started around 1943 and continued to operate until 1955. It worked on educating people on the history and struggle against colonialism and imperialism in Africa. It organised famine relief campaigns, legal defence funds and sit-ins and demonstrations. It organised public campaigns and fundraising for, amongst others, the ANC’s 1952 Defiance Campaign. The organisation was crippled by the emergence of the Cold War and the investigations of the House Un-American Activities Committee. It was repeatedly investigated.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 3]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Frances E. Williams

Frances E. Williams was a notable African-American actress and activist in Los Angeles from the early 1940s until her death in 1995. As an activist, she was an outspoken advocate for social justice and equality, and her political activism spanned outside her local community to around the world. She was most notably involved in the South African anti-apartheid movement and communist solidarity activities, including the National Anti-Imperialist Movement in Solidarity with African Liberations (NAIMSAL), the Los Angeles Chapter, and Art against Apartheid.

African Activist Archive

  • US AI002 MR-RT-140
  • Collection
  • 1950 - 1999
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Gathered from various repositories and private sources to preserve records and memories of activism in the United States in support of the struggles of African peoples against colonialism, apartheid, and social injustice from the 1950s through the 1990s.

A search for Rivonia Trial material yields:
-Photographs of demonstrations outside the South African Consulate in New York protesting the outcome of the Rivonia Trial (from private collections and American Committee on Africa)
-Buttons: "Free Motsoaledi", "Free Kathrada" "Free Mandela", "Happy birthday Motsoaledi" (from Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa)

Untitled

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Africa News Service

ANS started in 1973 as a not-for-profit US news agency. For two decades it gathered news about Africa related issues and the US foreign policy towards Africa. It continues to operate as AllAfrica Global Media.

Alexander Defence Committee

The ADC operated from 1965 until about 1971. It supported Dr Neville Alexander and other political prisoners and their families in South Africa, and was active in Canada, Europe and the USA. It organised speaker tours and raised funds, also for the families of political prisoners.

Anti-Apartheid Support Group

AASG was based at the University of North Carolina and consisted mainly of students. It operated from about 1980-1987, but was not officially recognised as a student organisation until October 1985. Its main focus was to pressurise the University to disinvest from South Africa. The group dissolved when the university voted to divest in 1987.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Boston Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa

BCLSA was established after the 1976 Soweto uprising and started with a campaign against the ties between the First National Bank (FNB) of Boston and South Africa. It remained a specialist organisation but broadened its activities to disinvestment and boycott. It helped to form MassDivest in 1980, an organisation which led the campaign to disinvest the state pension from companies doing business with South Africa. It ceased to be a separate organisation in the mid 1980s and joined other organisations such as Free South Africa and TransAfrica.

Champaign-Urbana Coalition against Apartheid

This was a campus based group at the University of Illinois. It operated from 1964 till about 1991 and worked especially for divestment by the university, boycott and human rights campaigns. The organisation continued and broadened its work in the early 1990s and changed its name to the Champaign-Urbana Coalition on Africa.

Committee to End Apartheid

This was an anti-apartheid group based in Springfield, Massassachusetts. In December 1978, as a result of a picket, Max Kay Jewelers agreed to stop selling the South African Krugerrand. Frances Crowe was a founding member.

Cornell University Divestment Movement

A group at Cornell University, consisting of academics, staff and students, organised divestment campaigns at the university from 1976-1987. The group organised sit-ins and civil disobedience activities.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 4]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Educators against Racism and Apartheid

Educators against Racism and Apartheid began in 1985 as Educators against Apartheid but it extended its activities to include racism in the USA and changed its name. Besides developing educational materials for schools and publishing a newsletter distributed to educators all over the country; it also organised a boycott of Kellogg’s cereals, appealing to young people. It was active in a campaign to withdraw US teachers’ retirement funds from companies dealing with South Africa.

International Council for Equality of Opportunity Principles

The ICEOP was founded in 1977 to promote social justice in South Africa. Reverend LH Sullivan devised a set of principles for companies conducting business in South Africa. This voluntary business code became known as the ‘Sullivan Principles’. The code required an annual independent evaluation of individual business activities in South Africa. The results were published in the public domain. The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and other anti-apartheid organisations disapproved of the ‘Sullivan Principles’ since it provided companies with a way out of the boycott.

International Defense and Aid Fund for Southern Africa- United States Committee

The US-IDAF was established in 1972. In addition to raising funds for legal defense of prisoners and aid for their dependents, it also disseminated information about conditions in Southern Africa and supported boycotts and other solidarity actions. It grew out of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). US-IDAF executive director Kenneth N. Carstens was also instrumental in the establishment of the Canadian IDAF.

International Oil Working Group

The IOWG worked towards the implementation of the oil embargo as initiated by the UN General Assembly. It grew out of the Sanctions Working Group, which was established in 1979. IOWD researched topics relating to the oil embargo, monitored tanker movements, gave testimonies at UN meetings, and distributed information. The organisation closed down in 1987.

Madison Anti-Apartheid Coalition

The Madison Anti-Apartheid Coalition started at the Madison Area Committee on Southern Africa and was active from 1968-1992. It was a student organisation at the University of Wisconsin to lobby and educate the community about South Africa, and to support the liberation movements.

Southern Africa Support Project

The SASP started in 1978 as a community-based organisation in Washington DC in support of the liberation struggles in Southern Africa. It gave political and material support to the liberation movements and was involved in fundraising and educational campaigns.

United Nations

The UN is an international organisation that aims to facilitate cooperation in international law, security, economic development, social progress, human rights and achieving world peace. It was founded in 1945 and replaced the League of Nations. It has been concerned with the issue of racial discrimination since its beginning and racism became an important item on the United Nations agenda after African nations attained independence and after the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa in 1960. The Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1963), which led to the International Convention in 1965. It proclaimed the International Year for Action to Combat Racial Discrimination in 1971 and the three Decades for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination in 1973. Besides the specialised agencies on apartheid, several other agencies of the UN were also involved in anti-apartheid and solidarity activities.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 3]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 4]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

Washington Office on Africa

The Washington Office on Africa (WOA) was founded in 1972 to support the movement for freedom from white-minority rule in southern Africa. It was initially sponsored by five organisations including the American Committee on Africa. It grew out of the Washington Office of the American Committee on Africa, which was established in 1967. Churches and labour unions supported the organisation to work with the Congress on Southern Africa legislation. The Washington Office on Africa Educational Fund (WOAEF) was established as the educational division of WOA.

Impact Visuals

Impact Visuals was a cooperative photo agency dedicated to social documentary photography. It started in 1964 and operated till 2001. Most of the archive comes from Afrapix, a now-dissolved South African collective of freelance photographers. Although most of the collection containing photographs, slides and negatives come from South Africa, it also covers other countries.

Memoirs

From Publishers Weekly
As a military intelligence officer in World War II, Rockefeller learned his effectiveness depended on his "ability to develop a network of people with reliable information and influence." During his long life-he turned 87 this year-he's amassed a Rolodex of more than 1,000 contacts, and in this satisfying autobiography, he describes firsthand encounters with Pablo Picasso, Sigmund Freud, Fiorello La Guardia, oil sheikhs, Latin American strongmen and others. Critics might say Rockefeller's not too choosy about the company he keeps ; they claim he's "never met a dictator he didn't like." Indeed, he has been roundly criticized for the role he and Henry Kissinger played in persuading the Carter administration to allow the exiled shah of Iran into the U.S., an event widely believed to have sparked the hostage crisis. But this memoir is much more than a titillating account of wealth and international intrigue. Rockefeller also meticulously recounts the modernizing of Chase Bank, where he worked for 35 years, rising to become chairman and chief executive, finally giving the company-which merged with JP Morgan in 2001-a written history on a par with Ron Chernow's The House of Morgan. New York City also dominates here ; after Robert Moses, the Rockefeller clan has had the strongest hand in shaping the modern urban landscape, from Wall Street to midtown to Morningside Heights. Indispensable for anyone interested in financial and American history, Rockefeller's well-organized remembrances present a deeply fascinating, thorough look into the life of a living legend.

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Lives That Changed The World: Nelson Mandela : [Filmography]

This profile on South African president Nelson Mandela tells the legendary leader's inspiring tale from the beginning, detailing his work as an activist, his 27 year imprisonment, and his ascension to the seat of political power that led the Nobel Peace Prize winner to inspire so many. First aired on the Smithsonian Network in 2007

Pequeneza, Nadine

Congressional Gold Medal, presented in Congress by Bill Clinton to Mandela

This item includes the bronze medal that is a duplicate of the Nelson Mandela Congressional Gold Medal. It is a coin description.

Reverse
Features compass points and a decorative spindle in the upper center of the medal. Children linked together encircle the upper border.

Obverse
Features a portrait of Nelson Mandela.

2013 Dole Leadership Award

on the 10th anniversary of the Prize: Mandela is the perfect example of an individual who fought for justice through the political system in place. He truly made a difference.

Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas

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